Hovudpersonen

The Good Soldier Švejk

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Franz Ferdinand and Sophie leave the Sarajevo Town Hall, five minutes before the assassination, 28 June 1914.

The Fateful Adventures of the Good Soldier Švejk is a novel with an unusually rich array of characters. In addition to the many who directly form part of the plot, a large number of fictive and real people (and animals) are mentioned; either through Švejk's anecdotes, the narrative or indirectly through words and expressions.

This web page contains short write-ups on the persons the novel refers to; from Napoléon in the introduction to captain Ságner in the last few lines of the unfinished Book Four. The list is sorted in to the order of which the names first appear. The chapter headlines are from Zenny K. Sadlon's recent translation and will in most cases differ from Cecil Parrott's version from 1973. In January 2014 there were still around twenty entries to be added.

  • The quotes in Czech are copied from the on-line version of the novel provided by Jaroslav Šerák and contain links to the relevant chapter
  • The tool-bar has links for direct access to Wikipedia, Google search and Švejk on-line

The names are coloured according to their role in the novel, illustrated by the following examples: Doctor Grünstein who is directly involved in the plot, Heinrich Heine as a historical person, and Ferdinand Kokoška as an invented person. Note that a number of seemingly fictive characters are modelled after living persons. See for instance Lukáš and Wenzl.

>> The Good Soldier Švejk index of people mentioned in the novel (582) Show all
>> I. In the rear
>> II. At the front
>> III. The famous thrashing
Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk's mishaps on the train

Nechlebann flag
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nechleba.png

Adresař, 1910.

Nechleba from Nekázanka ulice in Prague is mentioned by Švejk when he is explaining to Lukáš that he tries to do good but rarely succeeds. Nechleba suffered from the same bad luck.

Background

Nechleba was a rare name in Prague in 1910. Only three of them are listed in the address book and none of them in Nekázanka.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] „Poslušně hlásím, že jsem to, pane obrlajtnant, pozoroval. Já má, jak se říká, vyvinutej pozorovací talent, když už je pozdě a něco se stane nepříjemnýho. Já mám takovou smůlu jako nějakej Nechleba z Nekázanky, který tam chodil do hospody ,V čubčím háji’.
Purkrábeknn flag
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pulkrabek.jpg

Salon, 15.9.1934

pulkrabek_slavia.png

Chytilův adresář 1912

Purkrábek enters the plot as Švejk mistakenly thinks the bald passenger sitting opposite him is Purkrábek, a representative of Banka Slavia.

Background

Purkrábek was a common surname in Prague at the time, but address books do not reveal anyone that can be associated with the banking or insurance sectors.

Augustín Knesl Czech Švejkologist who for some period did research on the backdrop to the novel, concentrating on people. He published his findings in Večerní Praha in 1983. informs that some Jaroslav Purkrábek worked together with Hašek in Banka Slavia the short period he was employed there. Unfortunately it has not been possible to gather information about this person.

The author may also have been inspired by Rudolf Pulkrábek, a Czech banker and industrialist born in Frydland 28 August 1864. He took over the brickworks (cihelna) at Vokovice after the death of his father in 1882.

In 1912 he is listed as a member of the board of Banka Slavia, but he was better known as an executive of Hypoteční Banka where he had spent 25 years by 1914. Pulkrábek was re-elected as a board member in 1916 and in 1923 he had become managing director. In connection with his 70th birthday in 1934 a picture of him appeared in Salon. The sub-title reveals that he now held the position of vice president.

Jaroslav Hašek is likely to have known him from his brief employment at this bank in 1902 and 1903 or he might also have heard of him from his brother Bohuslav who was employed in the bank for his entire working career. Still there are marked differences between Pulkrábek and the bald literary figure. The former was in a position far above and ordinary representative and the photo from 1934 reveals that he was not completely bald. The reader may also object that Pulkrábek and Purkrábek are not identical names. This is true but the two are phonetically and lexically very close and were at times even interchanged. Examples of this can be found in Čech The entry "Čech" will be added in the future. and Pilsner Tagblatt.

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SourceAugustín Knesl Czech Švejkologist who for some period did research on the backdrop to the novel, concentrating on people. He published his findings in Večerní Praha in 1983.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] „Dovolte, vašnosti, neráčíte být pan Purkrábek, zástupce banky Slavie?“ Když holohlavý pán neodpovídal, řekl Švejk nadporučíkovi: „Poslušně hlásím, pane obrlajtnant, že jsem jednou četl v novinách, že normální člověk má mít na hlavě průměrně šedesát až sedumdesát tisíc vlasů a že černý vlasy bývají řidčí, jak je vidět z mnoha případů.“
[2.1] Von vopravdu je celej pan Purkrábek, zástupce banky Slavie. Ten chodil k nám do hospody a jednou, když u stolu usnul, tak mu na jeho pleš nějakej dobrodinec napsal inkoustovou tužkou:

Dovolujeme si vám tímto dle připojené sazby III. c) zdvořile nabídnouti
nastřádání věna a vybavení vašich dítek pomocí životního pojištění!
Generalmajor von Schwarzburgnn flag
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schwertburg1.png

Prager Tagblatt, 14.5.1914

pitlik.png

Jihočeské Listy, 17.3.1915

schwertburg.png

Jihočeské Listy, 2.6.1915

schwertburg2.png

Deutsche Böhmerwaldzeitung, 4.6.1915

pitlik1.png

Österreichische Illustrierte Zeitung, 17.5.1914

Von Schwarzburg enters the plot as Švejk mistakenly thinks the passenger opposite him is Purkrábek, a representative of Banka Slavia. Instead it turns out to be major general von Schwarzburg, a terrifying army inspector who is on his way to surprise the garrison in Budějovice. This episode was obviously very unpleasant for senior lieutenant Lukáš.

Background

No major general von Schwarzburg can not be found in military records but army inspectors did of course exist. Those were higher ranking senior officers. Responsible for the garrison in Budějovice was k.u.k. Militärkommando Prag (see Korpskommando) so army inspectors would be based there. At least two high ranking officers are known to have inspected Budějovice during or around the time that Jaroslav Hašek served there (17 February to 1 June 1915). They both held the rank Feldmarschalleutnant and were assigned to the Prague army corps.

Schwerdtner von Schwertburg

The most obvious inspiration for the bald and elderly gentleman on the train is Simon Ritter Schwerdtner von Schwertburg (1854-1925). The nobility suffix von Schwertburg is close enough to von Schwarzburg and within the author's margin of error with regard to spelling.

Schwerdtner was at the time commander of the Prague garrison to which he had been transferred from Olomouc in May 1914. His rank was Feldmarschalleutnant and he was promoted from Generalmajor Major General (cz. generalmajor), rank no. 5. General-Offizier. The rank above Oberst and below Feldmarschalleutnant. Typically brigade commander. on 1 May 1912. In Olomouc he served as commander of 5. Infanteriedivision from 2 May 1912.

He visited Budějovice for inspection purposes at least twice when Hašek served there and had also been there at least twice in the autumn of 1914. The dates of arrival were 13 April and 31 May 1915. He was present when EB91 Ersatzbataillon des 91.Infanterieregimentes
Replacement battalion of the 91st infantry regiment. Unit tasked with training reserve troops. To offset the losses in the war these were then dispatched to the front in in so-called march battalions, roughly once a month.
in two stages was transferred to Királyhida (1 June). That Jaroslav Hašek knew about Schwerdtner and his role is inevitable and he was surely present during at least one of the inspections.

The officer was known as a German chauvinist with a dislike for Czechs and was the driving force behind the execution of Kudrna in 1915. He was personally present at Motolské cvičiště when the soldier from IR102 The entry "IR102" will be added in the future. was executed. Schwerdtner claimed it was necessary to make an example to deter disloyal elements. He was generally known as a hard-liner on nationality issues and pushed hard for the arrest of Kramář and Scheiner i 1915. In 1913 in Olomouc he was the driving force behind a summary trial and following execution of the corporal Jan Bagacz who had shot senior lieutenant Rudolf Schramek during manoeuvres.

Pitlik von Rudan und Poria

The second high-ranking inspector based in Prague was Andreas Pitlik von Rudan und Poria (1856-1937) (cz. Ondřej Pytlík) who is known to have inspected the garrison in Budějovice in January, March and June 1915. Some newspapers reported briefly on the inspections and they also revealed that he stayed at Hotel Grand (located opposite the railway station).

Born in Plzeň he started his career in his native IR35 The entry "IR35" will be added in the future. and later served in numerous units, amongst them IR53 in Zagreb where he was promoted to major in 1898. At this time the 42 year old officer was also named Flügeladjutant for His Imperial Majesty. In December 1899 he had already become an Oberstleutnant Lieutenant Colonel (cz. podplukovník), rank no. 7. Stabs-Offizier. In 1914 typically battalion commanders. Due to the lack of officers they could later also command entire regiments. The rank above Major and below Oberst. . In 1906 his rank was Oberst and that year he was transferred to IR56 as the regiment's commander. In 1908 he was knighted with the noble suffix von Rudan und Poria.

At the outbreak of war in 1914 Pitlik was commander of the 24th Infantry Division in Przemyśl. He had been promoted from Generalmajor Major General (cz. generalmajor), rank no. 5. General-Offizier. The rank above Oberst and below Feldmarschalleutnant. Typically brigade commander. on 1 May 1914 but already in the autumn he requested and was granted a six month leave for health reasons. After a spa break he returned to service and from now on he served at k.u.k. Militärkommando Prag. From around 1 June 1915 he was formally in charge of training of the reserves in military district No. 8 (Prague, south and west Bohemia), the schools for one year volunteers, and recuperation hospitals.

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Quote from the novel
[2.1] A nyní se stalo něco hrozného. Holohlavý pán vyskočil, zařval na něho: „Marsch heraus, Sie Schweinkerl,“ vykopl ho do chodby, a vrátiv se do kupé, uchystal malé překvapení nadporučíkovi tím, že se mu představil. Byl to nepatrný omyl. Holohlavé individuum nebylo panem Purkrábkem, zástupcem banky „Slavie“, ale pouze generálmajorem von Schwarzburg. Generálmajor konal právě v civilu inspekční cestu po posádkách a jel překvapit Budějovice.
Krejčí Hývlnn flag
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Hývl was a tailor who was mentioned in an anecdote that Švejk tell Lukáš to execuse his thinking aloud in front of Generalmajor Major General (cz. generalmajor), rank no. 5. General-Offizier. The rank above Oberst and below Feldmarschalleutnant. Typically brigade commander. von Schwarzburg. He was unlucky with some utterances in his native Czech after assuming that the passenger Rous who was sitting opposite him wouldn't understand him. This happened on the train route Maribor - Leoben - Prague, by Sankt Moritz. The tailor was one the way home from a job in Styria.

Background

Any real person who might have served as inspiration for this literary tailor has not been possible to identify. In the 1910 Prague addess book there are only two Hývl's listed so it was obviously a rare surname. None of them were tailors (one cooper and one butcher). In army records the name is equally rare. Only two appear in Austro-Hungarian World War I World wide armed conflict that took place from 1914 to 1918. Is the backdrop of the novel these web pages are dedicated to. casualty lists and one joined České legie. None of them served in the same units as Hašek.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] To nám jednou před léty vypravoval krejčí Hývl, jak jel z místa, kde krejčoval ve Štyrsku, do Prahy přes Leoben a měl s sebou šunku, kterou si koupil v Mariboru. Jak tak jede ve vlaku, myslel si, že je vůbec jedinej Čech mezi pasažírama, a když si u Svatýho Mořice začal ukrajovat z tý celý šunky, tak ten pán, co seděl naproti, počal dělat na tu šunku zamilovaný voči a sliny mu začaly téct z huby. Když to viděl krejčí Hývl, povídal si k sobě nahlas: ,To bys žral, ty chlape mizerná.’
Rous, Vojtěchnn flag
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raus.png

Verlustliste Nr. 330, 6.12.1915.

Rous was the fellow passenger of the tailor Hývl in the anecdote told by Švejk to illustrate how one could be unlucky when thinking others don't understand ones own language. Švejk told this story on the train just before Tábor.

Background

In the Verlustliste (casualty list) from the battle of Chorupan Village in the Wolhynia province of Ukraine. On 24.9.1915 Jaroslav Hašek was captured here with hundreds of fellow soldiers from the 91st regiment. 24 September 1915 a soldier Adalbert Raus[1] of IR91 K.u.k. Infanterieregiment Nr. 91
(Royal and Imperial Infantry Regiment No. 91). One of 102 regular Austro-Hungarian infantry regiments, recruitment district Budweis. This is the regiment where Švejk and also Hašek served. A complete description of the regiment will follow later.
is listed as prisoner of war. This was actually the very battle where Jaroslav Hašek himself was captured. Both would thus have been part of the transfer on foot from the battle field by Dubno to the transit camp in Darnitsa, around 350 km.

If they didn't know each other already they may well have done so during the three weeks the march lasted. That said: even if Hašek knew Raus there is surely not more to it than name-borrowing.

[1]Adalbert is the German variation of Vojtěch.

A brutal murder
rous.png

Čas, 21.9.1907.

Another person who may have inspired the name was a farmer from Klášter by Nepomuk who was brutally murdered on 14 September 1907. The killer was his neighbour Vojtěch Mika who was eventually found guilty and sentenced to death. Jaroslav Hašek was an avid newspaper reader with an excellent memory of detail so he may perhaps have come across the news story and remembered it for later use.

External Links

Source: Jan Ciglbauer

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Když to viděl krejčí Hývl, povídal si k sobě nahlas: ,To bys žral, ty chlape mizerná.’ A ten pán mu česky vodpoví: ,To se ví, že bych žral, kdybys mně dal.’ Tak tu šunku sežrali společně, než přijeli do Budějovic. Ten pán se jmenoval Vojtěch Rous.“
Hofmannnn flag
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hofmann.png

Jindřich Hofmann, Žižkov

Národní archiv, Policejní ředitelství I, konskripce, karton 186, obraz 157.

Hofmann was mentioned in a conversation between Švejk and the attendant on the train between Prague and Tábor. Hofmann had claimed that emergency brakes do not work. This conversation led to the incident where Švejk was accused of having stopped the train.

Background

It has not possible to identify any real-life inspiration for Hofmann. The surname (or variations on it) was quite common, but without information like occupation, domicile etc. he is likelely to remain unidentified. In Prague there were several people with the surname Hofmann but none of them stands out as someone that Hašek would have been likely to associate with.

We may speculate that this anecdote was picked up in a pub. The author probably still lived in Žižkov when he wrote these passages and people from here are mentioned a few paragraphs later (Šnor and Kraus). If it is the case that the name Hofmann originates from the author's near surroundings it is of interest to note that two persons with this surname lived in Žižkov before World War I World wide armed conflict that took place from 1914 to 1918. Is the backdrop of the novel these web pages are dedicated to. and probably also after. Amongst them were Bohuslav Hofmann and Jindřich Hofmann.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] „Ke mně chodíval,“ rozhovořil se Švejk, „jeden dobrej člověk, nějakej Hofmann, a ten vždy tvrdil, že tyhle poplašný signály nikdy neúčinkují, že to zkrátka a dobře nefunguje, když se zatáhne za tuhle rukojeť.
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frantasnor.jpg

Franz Šnor, Žižkov

Národní archiv, Policejní ředitelství I, konskripce, karton 609, obraz 201.

Šnor was mentioned in an anecdote by Švejk because he had kneeled before the carriage of the Emperor when His Majesty visited Žižkov. He was fined 20 crowns, just like Švejk on the train to Tábor.

Background

František Šnor was the name of two men in Žižkov at the time in question. The youngest had a son Karel and it is possibly this Karel who was landlord at U kamenáče when Jaroslav Hašek wrote the first part of the novel during the spring of 1921. It is typical of the author to "re-use" names of real people in this manner. The imperial visit in question was probably that of 1907, but the emperor also visited Žižkov in 1901. See Starej Procházka.

Jaroslav Šerák

V Praze moc Šnorů nežilo, pouze dvě rodiny, ale na Žižkově žila skutečně jedna rodina Šnorů: Otec František *1847 a byl písařem ( officiant, Schreiber), měl syna Františka * 1873.Jeden z těchto Františků si mohl kleknout před kočár. Dále zde byl syn Karel * 1886 – ten mohl být tím hostinským „U kamenáče“.

SourceJaroslav Šerák Czech Hašek-expert, owner and editor of Virtuální muzeum Jaroslava Haška. Publisher of a compilation of Hašek's poems. Since 2009 in close cooperation with the owner of this web site, and content is regularly exchanged and inter-linked.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Jednou, když byl císař pán návštěvou na Žižkově, tak nějakej Franta Šnor zastavil jeho kočár tím, že si před císařem pánem kleknul na kolena do jízdní dráhy.
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hkrause.jpg

Heinrich Krause, Královské Vinohrady

Národní archiv, Policejní ředitelství I, konskripce, karton309, obraz 439.

Kraus was a police chief who is mentioned in the same anecdote as Šnor.

Background

The person rererred seems to be inspired by police inspector Heinrich Krause. He was borned 11 February 1859, lived in Vinohrady in 1908 and then in Lupačova ul. 12 in Žižkov in 1910. He was married with three children.

Jaroslav Šerák

Jméno Kraus se adresáři nevyskytuje, ale je tam inspektor jménem Jindřich [Heinrich] Krause. Zachovala se i policejní pobytová přihláška, kde je uveden v roce 1908 jako inspektor, bytem Vinohrady, č.p. 852.

External Links

SourceJaroslav Šerák Czech Hašek-expert, owner and editor of Virtuální muzeum Jaroslava Haška. Publisher of a compilation of Hašek's poems. Since 2009 in close cooperation with the owner of this web site, and content is regularly exchanged and inter-linked.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Potom ten policejní komisař z toho rayonu řekl k panu Šnorovi s pláčem, že mu to neměl dělat v jeho rayonu, že to měl udělat vo jednu ulici níž, co patří už pod policejního radu Krause, tam že měl vzdávat hold. Potom toho pana Šnora zavřeli.“
Mlíček, Františeknn flag
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Mlíček is mentioned in an anecdote by Švejk because he also had stopped a train by pulling the emergency brake. He was from Uhříněves by Prague and the incident had happened in May 1912.

Background

Any real life person who may have served as inspiration for this Mlíček has not been possible to identify. This despite the place Uhříněves and the year of 1912 may provide clues.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poněvadž železniční zřízenec neodpovídal, prohlásil Švejk, že znal nějakého Mlíčka Františka z Uhříněvse u Prahy, který také jednou zatáhl za takovou poplašnou brzdu a tak se lekl, že ztratil na čtrnáct dní řeč a nabyl ji opět, když přišel k Vaňkovi zahradníkovi do Hostivaře na návštěvu a popral se tam a voni vo něho přerazili bejkovec. „To se stalo,“ dodal Švejk, „v roce 1912 v květnu.“
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Vaněk was a gardener from Hostivař who is mentioned in the same anecdote as Mlíček.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poněvadž železniční zřízenec neodpovídal, prohlásil Švejk, že znal nějakého Mlíčka Františka z Uhříněvse u Prahy, který také jednou zatáhl za takovou poplašnou brzdu a tak se lekl, že ztratil na čtrnáct dní řeč a nabyl ji opět, když přišel k Vaňkovi zahradníkovi do Hostivaře na návštěvu a popral se tam a voni vo něho přerazili bejkovec. „To se stalo,“ dodal Švejk, „v roce 1912 v květnu.“
Wagnernn flag
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Wagner was a cruel station master in Svitava, mentioned in one of the many anecdotes Švejk reels off on this train journey.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Švejk vytáhl z bluzy dýmku, zapálil si, a vypouštěje ostrý dým vojenského tabáku, pokračoval: „Před léty byl ve Svitavě přednostou stanice pan Wagner. Ten byl ras na svý podřízený a tejral je, kde moh, a nejvíc si zalez na nějakýho vejhybkáře Jungwirta, až ten chudák se ze zoufalství šel utopit do řeky.
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Jungwirt was a switch operator in Svitavy, mentioned in the same anecdote as Wagner. He drowned himself due to persecution by Wagner but returned to haunt the latter who in turn hanged himself in a signal post.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Švejk vytáhl z bluzy dýmku, zapálil si, a vypouštěje ostrý dým vojenského tabáku, pokračoval: „Před léty byl ve Svitavě přednostou stanice pan Wagner. Ten byl ras na svý podřízený a tejral je, kde moh, a nejvíc si zalez na nějakýho vejhybkáře Jungwirta, až ten chudák se ze zoufalství šel utopit do řeky.
Sládek Zemannn flag
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zeman1.jpg

© Jan Profous

zeman2.png

Deník plukovníka Švece, s. 174

zeman.jpg

Ziman in the first row, third from the right.

© Milan Hodík

Zeman was allegedly a brewer in Zdolbunov, mentioned in a conversation between Švejk and his benefactor at the Tábor railway station. The latter asks the soldier to pass his greetings to Zeman. In this conversation Švejk is encouraged to defect as soon as he gets to the front, something he strongly indicates that he intends to do.

Background

Zeman may well have been Václav Zeman or a relative of his. He and his cousin Josef were brewers of Czech origin who in 1880 founded a brewery in Kvasilov, a Czech settlement a few kilometres north of Zdolbunov. We know little about this brewery, but Josef Jiři Švec notes in his diary that he met the brewer Zeman in the summer of 1915. Švec describes him as a tall and happy man, married to an interesting brown-haired lady. His brother was, like Švec, a member of Česká družina, a force of Czech volunteers who would later develop into the Czechslovak army in Russia , after the war known as the "legions".

About another Zeman brewery, we know a lot more. In 1888 Václav Zeman set up his own operation in Lutsk, and it was ultimately very successful. It was therefore logical to assume that Josef Zeman was sole proprietor in Kvasilov after this, and that it is him Hašek refers to in the novel.

Information from Alexandr Drbal however adds another twist to the story: Josef Zeman died in 1892, so the identity of Hašek's sládek Zeman is still in the dark. The Polish site Polskie etykiety z piwa do 1945 r (see link) however reveals that the Kvasilov brewery in the inter-war period was owned by a Josef Zeman, born in 1873.

How this Zeman was related to the older brewers is not known, but it would be natural to assume he was the son of the old Josef Zeman, and had continued his fathers operation in Kvasilov. If this hypothesis holds, it is this Zeman Jaroslav Hašek had in mind. It could even be that the Kvasilov operation was a branch of the Lutsk brewery, and in this case it was Václav that was referred to.

Newspaper clips from the end of the 19th century reveal that the owner of the brewery in Kavsilov was Anna Zemanová, presumably the widow of Josef Zeman.

The Zeman family had immigrated to Volyn from Bohemia in 1870, and the father of Václav; Josef, was also a brewer. In Lutsk the Zeman brewery operated until the plant was nationalised after the Soviet invasion of Poland in September 1939. In 1940 the family were deported to Siberia, but Václav Zeman never lived to experience this tragedy. In 2003 a brewery named Zeman opened again in Lutsk, and the building of the old brewery is still there.

Alexandr Drbal

Zeman Václav (*11 November 1864 Městec Králove, †24 August 1938 Luck, Polská republika, nyní Ukrajina; je pravděpodobně pohřben v obci Kvasilov, nyní Rivnenská oblast), sládek, podnikatel, činitel české menšiny v Polsku. Do Ruského císařství přijel s rodiči v září r. 1870. Studoval v Kyjevě, kde pak pracoval v jednom pivovaru. Spolu s bratrancem Josefem Zemanem (*?, †1892), bratrem spisovatele Antala Staška (*1843,†1931), vystavěl pivovar v Kvasilově (1880). Pak se osamostatnil a vystavěl „Czeski Browar parowy Wacława Zemana w Lucku“ (1888-90), kde vyráběl pivo značek „Sakura“, „Stolní“, „Ležák“, „Extra“, „Zdroj“, „Granat“, „Porter“ a „Bok-Bir“ a vyvážel ho do velkých měst v Polsku a Rusku a do Francie. Byl činný v českém krajanském hnutí v Polsku. Za První světové války v r. 1915 v pivovaru pracoval Jaroslav Hašek. Josef Zeman, o kterém jsem se zmínil v textu, byl bratranec Václava Zemana a syn spisovatele Antala Staška. O jeho otci můžu jen říci, že určitě byl statkářem vedle Lvova a v Kvasilově a pravděpodobně také členem České besedy ve Lvově, tedy nikoliv sládkem. Ale Jarda Hašek určitě znal pravě Václava Zemana a ne jeho otce nebo bratrance. Kdo je na fotce se musí ještě zjistit. Vždyť se ani neví přesně kde to je: v Zdolbunově nebo Lucku. Je také možně, že Václav Zeman měl v Zdolbunově filiálku! Řekl bych, že na fotce je Václav Zeman, ale to chce analýzu.

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Source: Josef Švec, Alexandr Drbal, Milan Hodik, Jan Profous

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Když odcházel, řekl důvěrně k Švejkovi: „Tak vojáčku, jak vám povídám, jestli budete v Rusku v zajetí, tak pozdravujte ode mne sládka Zemana v Zdolbunově. Máte to přece napsané, jak se jmenuji. Jen buďte chytrý, abyste dlouho nebyl na frontě.“ „Vo to nemějte žádnej strach,“ řekl Švejk, „je to vždycky zajímavý, uvidět nějaký cizí krajiny zadarmo.“
Zugsführer Hammel, Františeknn flag
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Hammel was a squad leader from the 21st artillery regiment depicted on a lithography in the military section of Tábor railway station. He is mentioned in the same breath corporals Paulhart and Bachmayer.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Dobrého vojáka Švejka uvítal obraz znázorňující dle nápisu, jak četař František Hammel a desátníci Paulhart a Bachmayer od c. k. 21. střeleckého pluku povzbuzují mužstvo k vytrvání. Na druhé straně visel obraz s nadpisem: „Četař Jan Danko od 5. pluku honvédských husarů vypátrá stanoviště nepřátelské baterie.“
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Paulhart was depicted on a litograpy in the military part of the Tábor railway station, mentioned together with Hammel and Bachmayer.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Dobrého vojáka Švejka uvítal obraz znázorňující dle nápisu, jak četař František Hammel a desátníci Paulhart a Bachmayer od c. k. 21. střeleckého pluku povzbuzují mužstvo k vytrvání. Na druhé straně visel obraz s nadpisem: „Četař Jan Danko od 5. pluku honvédských husarů vypátrá stanoviště nepřátelské baterie.“
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Bachmayer was depicted on a litograpy in the military part of the Tábor railway station, mentioned together with Hammel and Paulhart.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Dobrého vojáka Švejka uvítal obraz znázorňující dle nápisu, jak četař František Hammel a desátníci Paulhart a Bachmayer od c. k. 21. střeleckého pluku povzbuzují mužstvo k vytrvání. Na druhé straně visel obraz s nadpisem: „Četař Jan Danko od 5. pluku honvédských husarů vypátrá stanoviště nepřátelské baterie.“
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Oesterreichische Volks-Zeitung, 21.10.1914

Danko was a squad leader from Honvéd The entry "Honvéd" will be added in the future. husarenregiment Nr. 5, depicted on a lithography in the military section of Tábor railway station.

Background

Danko was exactly what the author described him as: squad leader in Honvéd The entry "Honvéd" will be added in the future. husarenregiment Nr. 5. On 21 October 1914 Oesterreichische Volks-Zeitung reported that he had been awarded the gold medal for bravery. The description in the newspaper is very close to the author's version. The regiment was stationed in Kassa (Košice) and the name indicates that Danko was a Slovak.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Na druhé straně visel obraz s nadpisem: „Četař Jan Danko od 5. pluku honvédských husarů vypátrá stanoviště nepřátelské baterie.“
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Verordnungsblatt für das k.u.k. Heer, 5.12.1914

bong1.jpg

Grazer Tagblatt, 19.2.1915

Bong was a soldier in Traineskadron Nr. 3 who was described in praising terms on a propaganda poster at Tábor station. He had saved the valuable harness of his dead horse, despite being shot at by Russian madmen. He was awarded a 2nd class silver medal for bravery.

Background

Bong was a real person and what the author reproduces is merely a more colourful variation of news items that appeared in the press in January and February 1915. All had the title Aus dem goldenen Buche der Armee, a series that was published regularly. It informed of various heroic deeds and some where also available as postcards, and probably as posters.

News about him having been awarded the silver medal 2nd class had been reported in newspapers in early December, based on Verordnungsblatt für das k.u.k. Heer from 5 December 1914.

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Quote from the novel
[2.1] Zatímco šikovatel šel shánět nějakého důstojníka, Švejk si přečetl na plakátu:

VOZATAJEC JOSEF BONG

Vojáci zdravotního sboru dopravovali těžce raněné k vozům, připraveným v kryté úžlabině. Jakmile byl plný, odjelo se s ním na obvaziště. Rusové, vypátravše tyto vozy, počali je obstřelovati granáty. Kůň vozatajce Josefa Bonga od c. a k. 3. vozatajské švadrony byl usmrcen střepinou granátu. Bong bědoval: „Ubohý můj bělouši, je veta po tobě!“ Vtom sám zasažen byl kusem granátu. Přesto vypřáhnul svého koně a odtáhl trojspřeží za bezpečný úkryt. Nato se vrátil pro postroj svého usmrceného koně. Rusové stříleli stále. „Jen si střílejte, zpropadení zuřivci, já postroj tady nenechám!“ a snímal dál postroj s koně, bruče si ona slova. Konečně byl hotov a vláčel se s postrojem zpět k vozu. Zde mu bylo vyslechnouti hromobití od zdravotních vojínů pro jeho dlouhou nepřítomnost. „Nechtěl jsem tam nechat postroj, je skoro nový. Bylo by ho škoda, pomyslil jsem si. Nemáme nazbyt takových věcí,“ omlouval se statečný vojín, odjížděje k obvazišti, kde se teprve hlásil jako raněný. Jeho rytmistr ozdobil později prsa jeho stříbrnou medalií za statečnost.
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Vojna is mentioned in an anecdote by Švejk about an example of courage that surpassed even that of Bong. Švejk had read a story in Pražské úřední listy that could reveal that the head of one-year volunteer Vojna had extorted great deeds even after it was shot off.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Takhle budou u nás v armádě samý nový postroje na koně, ale když jsem byl v Praze, tak jsem čet v Pražskejch úředních listech ještě hezčí případ vo nějakým jednoročním dobrovolníkovi Dr Josefu Vojnovi.
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Petrlík is a shoemaker mentioned by Švejk when he tries, in his long-winded way, to explain the lieutenant at the railway station in Tábor why he missed his train.

Background

Petrlík is a name the author may have borrowed from Jaroslav Salát-Petrlík who worked for the Czech social democrats (communists) in Moscow at the time Hašek returned from Russia in 1920. His original name was Petrlík.

Dokument československého parlamentu, 15 May 1921: Za nimi pak jel 11. října 1920 nynější vůdce československé kolonie v Moskvě, známý Salát-Petrlík, který byl určen, aby osobně řídil revoluční akci. Po nezdařeném pokusu se pak Salát opět vrátil do Moskvy, kamž přibyl 17. ledna 1920.

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SourceRadko Pytlík Prominent Czech publicist and literary historian (1928-), leading expert on Hašek, author of numerous books and articles about the author of Švejk. Considered the foremost living authority on Hašek and his life and writing.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] „Poslušně hlásím, pane lajtnant, že vono je třeba, aby to lezlo ze mě jako z chlupatý deky, aby byl přehled vo celý události, jak to vždycky říkal nebožtík švec Petrlík, když poroučel svýmu klukovi, než ho začal řezat řemenem, aby si svlíkl kalhoty.“
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Palánek was given the task to get Švejk a ticket onwards to Budějovice. He didn't have any money so his superior decided that Švejk had to continue on foot.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poněvadž se Švejk nehýbal a stále držel ruku na štítku čepice, poručík zařval: „Marsch hinaus, neslyšel jste, abtreten? Korporál Palánek, vezměte toho chlapa blbého ke kase a kupte mu lístek do Českých Budějovic!“ Desátník Palánek se za chvíli objevil opět v kanceláři. Pootevřenými dveřmi nakukovala za Palánkem dobromyslná tvář Švejkova.
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The Judgement of Solomon by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo.

Solomon is mentioned by the author when he describes the lieutenants drastic decision to let Švejk walk to Budějovice. He uses the expressions "Solomonic solution".

Background

Solomon was king of Judea in the Old Testament, the son of David. He was famed for his wisdom. Whether or not he existed is debateable.

A Solomonic Judgement is a fair and wise solution to a difficult problem. The saying is based upon the Biblical passage in 1 Kings 3:16-28, where king Solomon decided a disagreement between two mothers about a child which both claimed was their.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poručík dlouho nedal na sebe čekat se šalomounským rozřešením trudné otázky. „Tak ať jde pěšky,“ rozhodl, „ať ho zavřou u pluku, že se opozdil; kdo se s ním tady bude tahat.“

Also written:Šalomoun cz Salomo de

Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk's mishaps on the train


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