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The Good Soldier Švejk

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Map of Austria-Hungary in 1914. The itinerary of Švejk took place entirely within the borders of the Dual Monarchy.

The Fateful Adventures of the Good Soldier Švejk is a novel which contains a wealth of geographical references - either directly through the plot, in dialogues or in the authors own observations. Jaroslav Hašek was himself unusually well travelled and had a photographic memory of geographical (and other) details. It is evident that he put great emphasis on this: 8 of the 27 chapter headlines in Švejk contain place names.

This web page will in due course contain a full overview of all the geographical references in the novel; from Prague in the introduction to Klimontów in the unfinished Book Four. Countries, cities, towns, villages, mountains, oceans, lakes, rivers, islands, buildings are included. Note that from 14 September 2013, institutions (including pubs) have been moved to the new 'Institutions' page. The list is sorted according to the order in which the names appear through the novel. The chapter headlines are from Zenny K. Sadlon's recent translation and will in most cases differ from Cecil Parrott British diplomat and academic (1909-1984), biographer of Hašek, translator of Švejk and several short stories. Author of a conceptual study on Švejk and the short stories. 's translation from 1973.

  • The facts are mainly taken from Internet sources but cross-verified when possible
  • The quotes in Czech are copied from the on-line version of Švejk: provided by Jaroslav Šerák Czech Hašek-expert, owner and editor of Virtuální muzeum Jaroslava Haška. Publisher of a compilation of Hašek's poems. Since 2009 in close cooperation with the owner of this web site, and content is regularly exchanged and inter-linked. and contain links to the relevant chapter
  • The toolbar has links for direct access to Wikipedia, Google maps, Google search, svejkmuseum.cz and Švejk online

The names are coloured according to their role in the novel, illustrated by these examples: Sanok as a location where the plot takes place, Dubno mentioned in the narrative, Zagreb as part of a dialogue, and Pakoměřice as mentioned in an anecdote.

>> The Good Soldier Švejk index of places mentioned in the novel (580) Show all
>> I. In the rear
>> II. At the front
>> III. The famous thrashing
Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk's mishaps on the train

Mediterranean Seann flag
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Bohemia, 28.4.1915

middelhavet.jpg

Arbeiterwille, 17.5.1915

Mediterranean Sea is just about mentioned as Lukáš on the train to Budějovice reads in Bohemia about the success of the German submarine "E" and bombs thrown from aeroplanes that explode three times in a row.

Background

Mediterranean Sea is an ocean between Europe and Africa, with western Asia to the east and the Atlantic Ocean to the west. The following countries bordering the Mediterranean participated in World War I World wide armed conflict that took place from 1914 to 1918. Is the backdrop of the novel these web pages are dedicated to. : Austria-Hungary, France, Italy, Greece, Montenegro og Turkey.

Austria-Hungary had access to Mediterranean Sea from Trieste and along the coast of Dalmatia down to Montenegro, k.u.k. Kriegsmarine The Imperial and Royal Navy possessed a sizeable fleet. Their main base was at Pola (now Pula, Croatia). During the war they were however limited to operations in the Adriatic See as the Entente First World War alliance consisting of the British Empire, France and Russia, augmented by Italy in 1915 and USA in 1917. The Entente eventually emerged victorious in the world war. blockaded the sea at the southern tip of Italia.

Submarines in the Mediterranean

At the time the episode is supposed to have taken place (late 1914 or early 1915) there were no German U-boats in the Mediterranean Sea, they only appeared later that year. Not could they have been called "E" as all German U-boats had names starting with "U" (Unterseeboot). The German air force did however use war planes classed "E" (Eindecker), so perhaps the author swapped U-boats with aeroplanes?

Austro-Hungarian U-boats were also designated by the letter "U". They had been active in the Adriatic See from the outbreak of war, and on 27 April 1915 the French cruiser Léon Gambetta was torpedoed by "U-5". In 1914 k.u.k. Kriegsmarine The Imperial and Royal Navy owned 5 U-boats, a number that rose to 26 by 1918. Almost all of them were built in Germany.

Hans-Peter Laqueur

In the train from Prague to Budweis (late December 1914) Lukasch reads in the „Bohemia“ about the successful actions of the German submarine „E“ in the Mediterranean Sea:

* There was no German submarine „E“. „E“ and a number was used by submarines of the Royal Navy.

* There were no German submarines in the Mediterranean before May 1915 (cf. Hans Werner Neulen, Adler und Halbmond. Das deutsch-türkische Bündnis 1914-1918. Frankfurt/Berlin 1994, p. 91 ff.).

Hašek probably refers to the actions of U 35 sinking 12 ships with a total 48813 GRT in October/November 1915 (cf. de.wikipedia: „Waldemar Kophamel“ and „SM U 35“) or of U 38 (14 ships, 47460 GRT), late 1915 as well (cf. de.wikipedia: „Max Valentiner“ and „SM U 38“).

External Links

SourceHans-Peter Laqueur German historian and orientalist (1949-), author of a conceptual study on Turkish themes in Švejk. Using his thorough knowledge on European and Turkish history, he has helped improve this web site significantly.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Nadporučíkovi bezděčně zacvakaly zuby, vzdychl si, vytáhl z pláště „Bohemii“ a četl zprávy o velkých vítězstvích, o činnosti německé ponorky „E“ na Středozemním moři, ...

Also written:Středozemní moře cz Mittelmeer de Mar Mediterraneo it Mare Mediterraneum la

Montenegronn flag
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Hedemarkens Amtstidende, 17.1.1916.

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The Great War, Volume 7.

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The border regions with Montenegro

Schematismus für das k.u.k. Heer ... 1914.

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IR91, 1.Baon. by Cattaro.

Schematismus für das k.u.k. Heer ... 1914.

Montenegro is mentioned in the description of major general von Schwarzburg who punished breaches of service regulations by transferring the culprit to some drink-infested and dirty garrison in a desolate corner of Galicia or to the border with Montenegro.

Background

Montenegro (Црна Гора) was in 1914 an independent kingdom and had been a duchy (kingdom from 1910) since the liberation from Turkey in 1878. King at the time was Nikola I. and the capital was Cetinje.

Today Montenegro is again an independent state, after having been part of various south slav federations from 1918 until 2006 (except 1941-45). The language is Serbian, is written with the Cyrillic script and the religion is mainly orthodox.

Montenegro at war

In World War I World wide armed conflict that took place from 1914 to 1918. Is the backdrop of the novel these web pages are dedicated to. the kingdom quickly aligned with Serbia and declared war on Austria-Hungary on 7 August 1914. Along the border there was fighting already from August 1914 but it remained a stalemate until k.u.k. Heer launched a full-scale invasion of Montenegro on 5 January 1916. The invasion was made possible by the recent defeat of Serbia, making large forces available for the attack, and it was now also possible to attack from Serb territory. King Nikola I. sued for peace, but the terms were so harsh that he rejected them. Because he had fled the country, the king could not stop the politicians that remained from accepting the terms. On 19 January the treaty was signed and Montenegro remained occupied for the rest of the war.

The Austrian-Montenegrin border

Hašek mentions the regions bordering Montenegro, so let us try to identify the garrisons to where officers may have been sent by the fearsome army inspector, major general von Schwarzburg.

In 1914 the kingdom of Dalmatia (as part of Austria) and Bosnia-Hercegovina both shared a short border with Montenegro and both k.u.k. Heer and k.u.k. Kriegsmarine The Imperial and Royal Navy had garrisons in the region. The navy had a heavy presence in Cattaro (Kotor), and it was one of empire's three naval bases. The border between Herzegovina and Montenegro was much longer and this region also had a significant military presence. In this context we will however need to look for army garrisons in southern Dalmatia.

Korpskommando Nr. 16 var forlagd i Ragusa (Dubrovnik) som òg var den viktigaste garnisonsbyen i grenseområda. Utover dette var hær-einingar utplasserte i Castelnuovo (Herceg-Novi), Trebinje, and Bileća. Dei to siste låg i Hercegovina.

Of particular interest is Castelnuovo as it hosted the 47th Infantry Division. Assigned to this unit was also the 1st battalion of IR91 K.u.k. Infanterieregiment Nr. 91
(Royal and Imperial Infantry Regiment No. 91). One of 102 regular Austro-Hungarian infantry regiments, recruitment distruct Budweis. This is the regiment where Švejk and also Hašek served.
who had been garrisoned here since 1906 as part of 14. Gebirgsbrigade (14th Mountain Brigade). In 1907 and 1908 they were located in Budua (Budva), in 1909 and 1910 in Cattaro, in 1911 in Crkvice, in 1912 Perzagno (Prčanj), in 1913 and 1914 Teodo (Tivat)[1]. Individual units were at the outbreak of war scattered: Teodo, Kozmač, Sutomore, Castellastua (Petrovac). Staničičkaserne in Teodo was the main site of the battallion.

[1] Years are according to from Schematismus für das k.u.k. Heer... and thus usually reflects the state of the previous year. When a unit is listed from 1907 it therefore means that they were moved here already in 1906.

Budva was actually the southernmost garrison in the entire empire. Former commander of IR91 K.u.k. Infanterieregiment Nr. 91
(Royal and Imperial Infantry Regiment No. 91). One of 102 regular Austro-Hungarian infantry regiments, recruitment distruct Budweis. This is the regiment where Švejk and also Hašek served.
, 1. battalion, Franz Graf, later wrote that being sent there was like being exiled, having to "spend years away from women, beer and the domestic conviviality". Still all who had been there agreed it was a beautiful place. The biggest problem was however the distance to home, and in the spring the soldiers from South Bohemia longed after some good beer. They could still get hold of strong Dlamatian wine but it was often poisonous!

The battalion remained in the area also during the first month of the war but from 5 September 1914 they were transported by train to the front against Serbia further north. They joined the rest of the regiment as late as 1916, on the Italian front. At least one familiar name from Švejk served in southern Dalmatia before the war: Josef Adamička. It is also possible that Jan Vaněk served here during the first month of the war. A more marginal figure (in a Švejk-context), Oberleutnant First or senior lieutenant (cz. nadporučík). Predominantly commissioned offisers who led companies. As the number of professional officers dwindled, they were by 1915 sometimes battalion commander. Wurm, served here as commander of the battalion's machine gun unit.

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Quote from the novel
[2.1] Měl manii přeložit vždy důstojníka na nejnepříjemnější místa. Stačilo to nejmenší, a důstojník se již loučil se svou posádkou a putoval na černohorské hranice nebo do nějakého opilého, zoufalého garnisonu v špinavém koutě Haliče.

Also written:Černá Hora cz Црна Гора sb

Styriann flag
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Styria is mentioned on an anecdote by Švejk about the tailor Hývl who had a slip of tongue on the train route Maribor - Leoben - Prague because he thought no-one else in the compartment spoke Czech.

Background

Styria was until 1918 an Austrian crown land with the official name Herzogtum Steiermark. The area was larger than the current Austrian state of Styria as it included parts of current Slovenia with Ljubljana (Laibach) and Maribor (Marburg). The capital was (and is) Graz, and at the time a significant part of the population were Slovenes (nearly 30 per cent).

Jaroslav Hašek visited Styria during his summer travels in 1905 and has probably drawn inspiration for this section of his novel from this trip.

External Links

Quote from the novel
[2.1] To nám jednou před léty vypravoval krejčí Hývl, jak jel z místa, kde krejčoval ve Štyrsku, do Prahy přes Leoben a měl s sebou šunku, kterou si koupil v Mariboru.

Also written:Štyrsko cz Štajerska sl

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Leoben around 1900

Leoben is mentioned on an anecdote by Švejk about the tailor Hývl who had a slip of tongue on the train route Maribor - Leoben - Prague because he thought no-one else in the compartment spoke Czech.

Background

Leoben is the second largest city in the Austrian state of Styria with around 25,000 inhabitants.

External Links

Quote from the novel
[2.1] To nám jednou před léty vypravoval krejčí Hývl, jak jel z místa, kde krejčoval ve Štyrsku, do Prahy přes Leoben a měl s sebou šunku, kterou si koupil v Mariboru.
Maribornn flag
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Maribor is mentioned on an anecdote by Švejk about the tailor Hývl who had a slip of tongue on the train route Maribor - Leoben - Prague because he thought no-one else in the compartment spoke Czech.

Background

Maribor is the second largest city in Slovenia, located on the river Drava. Until 1918 it belonged to the Austrian crown land of Styria and was at the time 80 per cent German-speaking.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] To nám jednou před léty vypravoval krejčí Hývl, jak jel z místa, kde krejčoval ve Štyrsku, do Prahy přes Leoben a měl s sebou šunku, kterou si koupil v Mariboru.

Also written:Marburg an der Drau de

Sankt Moritznn flag
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k.u.k Eisenbahnkarte 1905.

Sankt Moritz is mentioned in an anecdote by Švejk about the tailor Hývl who had a slip of tongue on the train Maribor - Leoben - Prague because he thought that the other passengers didn't understand what he said. This unfortunate episode happened by Sankt Moritz.

Background

Sankt Moritz appears to have been somewhere in Austria between Leoben and Linz but no such place has be located. The author obviously didn't refer to the famous Swiss tourist resort of the same name. The most likely candidate is Sankt Michael in Obersteiermark which is on a possible route to Linz, soon after Leoben.

The author's knowledge of this route might have been aquired during a trip he did in 1905 together with the painter Jaroslav Kubín and the actor František Vágner.

External Links

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Jak tak jede ve vlaku, myslel si, že je vůbec jedinej Čech mezi pasažírama, a když si u Svatýho Mořice začal ukrajovat z tý celý šunky, tak ten pán, co seděl naproti, počal dělat na tu šunku zamilovaný voči a sliny mu začaly téct z huby. Když to viděl krejčí Hývl, povídal si k sobě nahlas: ,To bys žral, ty chlape mizerná.’

Also written:Svatý Mořic cz

Tábornn flag
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tabor.jpg

Tábor viewed from Klokoty.

Tábor plays an important role in the plot because the journey from Prague to Budějovice was unexpectedly aborted in Tábor after Švejk had his many mishaps on the train, leading to his famous anabasis. Thus a large part of the plot in [2.1] takes place at the train station in Tábor.

Background

Tábor is a town in South Bohemia with about 35,000 inhabitants (2010). The historical centre is under protection and very attractive. The town was the centre of the radical Hussite movement and has therefore played an important role in Czech history.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Zůstal průvodčí se Švejkem a mámil na něm dvacet korun pokuty, zdůrazňuje, že ho musí v opačném případě předvést v Táboře přednostovi stanice. „Dobrá,“ řekl Švejk, „já rád mluvím se vzdělanejma lidma a mě to bude moc těšit, když uvidím toho táborskýho přednostu stanice.“
Uhříněvesnn flag
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Uhříněves is mentioned in the anecdote about František Mlíček who also was unlucky and pulled the emergency brake of a train. The place is also mentioned in an anecdote in the final chapter.

Background

Uhříněves is a suburb on the south-eastern outskirts of Prague, also known as Praha 22. From 1913 until 1974 it was administratively a separate city. The trains southwards stop here, so it surely saw a brief stay by Švejk and Lukáš on their way to Budějovice.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poněvadž železniční zřízenec neodpovídal, prohlásil Švejk, že znal nějakého Mlíčka Františka z Uhříněvse u Prahy, který také jednou zatáhl za takovou poplašnou brzdu a tak se lekl, že ztratil na čtrnáct dní řeč a nabyl ji opět, když přišel k Vaňkovi zahradníkovi do Hostivaře na návštěvu a popral se tam a voni vo něho přerazili bejkovec. „To se stalo,“ dodal Švejk, „v roce 1912 v květnu.“
Hostivařnn flag
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Hostivař is mentioned in the anecdote about Mlíček who also was unlucky and pulled the emergency brake of a train. The tailor Vaňek came from here.

Background

Hostivař is an urban area in the south-eastern outskirts of Prague, which since 1922 has been part of the capital. It has a railway station and is also the terminus of metro line A. Hostivař is also a popular area for recreation.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Poněvadž železniční zřízenec neodpovídal, prohlásil Švejk, že znal nějakého Mlíčka Františka z Uhříněvse u Prahy, který také jednou zatáhl za takovou poplašnou brzdu a tak se lekl, že ztratil na čtrnáct dní řeč a nabyl ji opět, když přišel k Vaňkovi zahradníkovi do Hostivaře na návštěvu a popral se tam a voni vo něho přerazili bejkovec. „To se stalo,“ dodal Švejk, „v roce 1912 v květnu.“
Svitavynn flag
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Svitavy is mentioned in the anecdote about station master Wagner and the point operator Jungwirt.

Background

Svitavy is a town in East Bohemia which in 1914 was mainly German speaking. It is also known as the birthplace of Oskar Schindler, to which honour the town has erected a monument, not without controversy. In 1866 the ceasefire between Austria and Prussia was signed here.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Švejk vytáhl z bluzy dýmku, zapálil si, a vypouštěje ostrý dým vojenského tabáku, pokračoval: „Před léty byl ve Svitavě přednostou stanice pan Wagner. Ten byl ras na svý podřízený a tejral je, kde moh, a nejvíc si zalez na nějakýho vejhybkáře Jungwirta, až ten chudák se ze zoufalství šel utopit do řeky.

Also written:Svitava Hašek Zittau Reiner Zwittau de

Stará bránann flag
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Stará brána is mentioned by the man who was arrested for sedition at Tábor station. He tells that he is a butcher from there and didn't mean it that seriously.

Background

Stará brána must have been a town gate in Tábor, but not to be found on modern maps. It was probably a common name for Bechyňská brána, the only city gate which is still intact.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Nešťastný občan nezmohl se na nic jiného než na upřímné tvrzení, že je přece řeznický mistr od Staré brány a že to tak nemyslel.

Also written:Old Gate en Alter Tor de Gamle Port no

Zdolbunovnn flag
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Zdolbunov is mentioned is a conversation between Švejk and a passenger at Tábor station. The stranger gives him the name of the brewer Zeman in Zdolbunov and urges him not too stay too long at the front. Švejk's answer more than suggests that he intends to let himself be captured, just as the author did. See also Zeman.

Background

Zdolbunov (now Zdolbuniv) is a town in the Volyn region of the Ukraine. It is also an important railway junction. The author passed by Zdolbunov after he was captured at Khorupan on September 24 1915. Presumably the prisoners waited for onward rail transport here. The brewery of the mentioned Zeman was located in Kvasilov (now Kvasyliv), 4 km northwards towards Rovno (now Rivne).

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Když odcházel, řekl důvěrně k Švejkovi: „Tak vojáčku, jak vám povídám, jestli budete v Rusku v zajetí, tak pozdravujte ode mne sládka Zemana v Zdolbunově. Máte to přece napsané, jak se jmenuji. Jen buďte chytrý, abyste dlouho nebyl na frontě.“ „Vo to nemějte žádnej strach,“ řekl Švejk, „je to vždycky zajímavý, uvidět nějaký cizí krajiny zadarmo.“

Also written:Zdolbunov cz Zdołbunów pl Здолбунов ru Здолбунів ua

Szegednn flag
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Světozor, 1915

szeged1.png

© Richard Georg Plaschka

Szeged is mentioned in a conversation at Tábor railway station. A soldier from the 28th regiment relates how Hungarians there mocked the Czechs by holding their hands up to demonstrate how easily the latter gave themselves up.

Background

Szeged is a city in southern Hungary, right on the Serbian border. It is the third largest city in Hungary and a major centre of education. It is located by the river Tisza.

In January 1915 the replacement battalion of IR28 The entry "IR28" will be added in the future. was transferred from Prague to Szeged, one of the first Czech regiments that were separated from their recruitment district. This was as a preventive action against nationalism and disloyalty. IR91 K.u.k. Infanterieregiment Nr. 91
(Royal and Imperial Infantry Regiment No. 91). One of 102 regular Austro-Hungarian infantry regiments, recruitment distruct Budweis. This is the regiment where Švejk and also Hašek served.
and other Czech regiments were moved later that year, Jaroslav Hašek and his regiment suffered the same fate on 1 June, an occasion he describes in the novel.

The timing of the transfer of IR28 The entry "IR28" will be added in the future. gives a certain clue as to the timing of events in the novel - in general to be taken with a pinch of salt due to the novels many anachronisms. Švejk must according to this logic have been in Tábor after 20 January because soldiers from IR28 hardly could have set foot in Szeged until then. The author himself passed Tábor mid February 1915, so it is quite possible that he himself could have heard/experienced something similar at the time.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Od vedlejšího stolu řekl nějaký voják, že když přijeli do Segedína s 28. regimentem, že na ně Maďaři ukazovali ruce do výšky.

Also written:Segedín cz Szegedin de

Čáslavnn flag
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Čáslav is mentioned by a Landwehr K.k. Landwehr
The territorial army of the Austrian part of the Dual Monarchy.
-soldier at the railway station in Tábor. The themes was conflicts between Czechs and Germans. An editor from Vienna refused to speak Czech until he one day found himself in a march company with Czechs only. Then he suddenly understood their language.

Background

Čáslav is a city in Central Bohemia, not far from Kutná Hora. The number of inhabitants is around 10,000. In 1914 the 2nd batallion of IR21 were garrisoned here, whereas staff was located in Kutná Hora.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Landverák si odplivl: „U nás v Čáslavi byl jeden redaktor z Vídně, Němec. Sloužil jako fähnrich. S námi nechtěl česky ani mluvit, ale když ho přidělili k maršce, kde byli samí Češi, hned uměl česky.“

Also written:Tschaslau de

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bojiste1.png

Na Bojišti in 1884, "U kalicha" has not yet been built

Na Bojišti is mentioned by Švejk in the conversation with the lieutenant at Tábor station who accuses him of being degenerated.

Background

Na Bojišti is a street in Praha II. that in the mid 19th century was known as Windberg. It was surrounded by fields and gardens, only 3-4 houses can be seen. By 1875 maps show many additional buildings and a street now called Wahlstatt, a name that corresponds to the street's current name (Battlefield). The building U kalicha was amongst the last to be built. It is not on the map from 1884, but by 1889 it has appeared.

In number 463/10 a Josef Švejk lived in 1912 and was a person Jaroslav Hašek may have known about when he wrote the novel. In the same house Antonín Nosek ran a brothel (1912), and this may explain why the good soldier told Vodička that they have girls at U kalicha.

From 1876 onwards the street is repeatedly mentioned in the press, albeit in minor headlines. In the years before 1900 several suicides are reported. An article in Prager Tagblatt in 1885 mentions the poor hygienic conditions, and several cases of typhus. In 1914 the same newspaper reports that the police are making an effort to limit street prostitution. In 1915 small adverts reveal than many Jewish refugees from Galicia rented rooms in the street, particularly in no. 8 and 10. Incidentally many rooms and flats were for rent here also before the war.

There is every indication that Švejk lived in or near this street - both because he was a regular at U kalicha and that he says by us at the corner of Bojistě and Kateřinská ulice.

External Links

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Tyto úvahy shrnul v jednu větu, s kterou se obrátil k Švejkovi: „Vy jste, chlape, degenerovanej. Víte, co je to, když se o někom řekne, že je degenerovaný?“ „U nás na rohu Bojiště a Kateřinský ulice, poslušně hlásím, pane lajtnant, byl taky jeden degenerovanej člověk. Jeho otec byl jeden polskej hrabě a matka byla porodní bábou. Von met ulice a jinak si po kořalnách nenechal říkat než pane hrabě.“

Also written:Wahlstatt de

Kateřinská ulicenn flag
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Kateřinská ulice is mentioned by Švejk in the conversation at Tábor station where the lieutenant accuses him of being degenerated. Švejk refers to it by saying "by us at the corner of Kateřinská and Bojiště".

Background

Kateřinská ulice is a street in Nové město Prague's new town, also known as Praha_II. , Prague. This is also the location of Kateřinky, the madhouse where Švejk spent some time early in the novel. The text indicates that Švejk lived in or near this street, but referring to the corner with Na Bojišti makes no sense, as the streets don't meet. Švejk may have meant the corner of Ječná ulice and Sokolská ulice where the author lived for a short period in 1888 and 1889.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Tyto úvahy shrnul v jednu větu, s kterou se obrátil k Švejkovi: „Vy jste, chlape, degenerovanej. Víte, co je to, když se o někom řekne, že je degenerovaný?“ „U nás na rohu Bojiště a Kateřinský ulice, poslušně hlásím, pane lajtnant, byl taky jeden degenerovanej člověk. Jeho otec byl jeden polskej hrabě a matka byla porodní bábou. Von met ulice a jinak si po kořalnách nenechal říkat než pane hrabě.“
Polandnn flag
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Poland with borders from 1772 and after the partitions 1772, 1793 and 1795.

Poland is mentioned indirectly through a Polish count. This happens when Švejk is accused by the lieutenant in Tábor of being degenerated. He retorts with an anecdote about the degenerate count. The final part of the plot takes place in current south-eastern Poland and the in 1915 partly Polish speaking Eastern Galicia.

Background

Poland was in 1914 still split between Austria, Germany and Russia but Polish culture, language and nationhood survived. In 1918 Poland reappeared on the map after having been partitioned since 1795.

Quote from the novel
[2.1] Tyto úvahy shrnul v jednu větu, s kterou se obrátil k Švejkovi: „Vy jste, chlape, degenerovanej. Víte, co je to, když se o někom řekne, že je degenerovaný?“ „U nás na rohu Bojiště a Kateřinský ulice, poslušně hlásím, pane lajtnant, byl taky jeden degenerovanej člověk. Jeho otec byl jeden polskej hrabě a matka byla porodní bábou. Von met ulice a jinak si po kořalnách nenechal říkat než pane hrabě.“

Also written:Polsko cz Polen de Polska pl

Index Back Forward II. At the front Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk's mishaps on the train


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