Tooltip container
Hovudpersonen

The Good Soldier Švejk

Hovudpersonen Change languageChange language
Change languageChange language

People

Novel on-lineŠvejk MuseumLiterární ArchivFacebookŠvejk CentralBlogTravel diaryContact

Erzherzog Franz Ferdinand and Herzogin Sophie leave the Sarajevo Town Hall, five minutes before the assassination, 28 June 1914.

The Fateful Adventures of the Good Soldier Švejk is a novel with an unusually rich array of characters. In addition to the many who directly form part of the plot, a large number of fictional and real people (and animals) are mentioned; either through Švejk's anecdotes, the narrative or indirectly through words and expressions.

This web page contains short write-ups on the persons the novel refers to; from Napoléon in the introduction to Hauptmann Ságner in the last few lines of the unfinished Book Four. The list is sorted in to the order of which the names first appear. The chapter headlines are from Zenny Sadlon's recent translation (1999-2008) and will in most cases differ from Cecil Parrott's version from 1973. In January 2021 there are still around twenty entries to be added.

The quotes in Czech are copied from the on-line version of The Good Soldier Švejk: provided by Jaroslav Šerák and contain links to the relevant chapter. The toolbar has links for direct access to Wikipedia, Google maps, Google search, svejkmuseum.cz and the novel on-line.

The names are coloured according to their role in the novel, illustrated by the following examples: Dr. Grünstein who is directly involved in the plot, Heinrich Heine as a historical person, and Otto Katz as a fictional character. Note that a number of seemingly fictive characters are inspired by living persons. See for instance Oberleutnant Lukáš and Major Wenzl.

Titles and ranks have until 2020 largely been missing on this web page. Senior Lieutenant Lukáš has, for instance, only been known as Lukáš. This weakness is now (24 December 2020) slowly being addressed. Military ranks and other titles related to Austrian officialdom will appear in German, and in line with the terms used at the time. This means that Captain Ságner is still referred to as Hauptmann although the term is now obsolete, having been replaced by Kapitän. Civilian titles denoting profession etc. are mostly translated into English.

>> The Good Soldier Švejk index of people, mythical figures, animals ... (581) Show all
>> I. In the rear
>> II. At the front
>> III. The famous thrashing
Index Back Forward IV. The famous thrashing continued Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk in the transport of russian prisoners of war

Jaroslav ze Šternberkann flag
*1220 - †1287
Wikipedia cz Google search

Jaroslav ze Šternberka is mentioned by Švejk when he tells his fellow prisoner who is a Crimean Tatar how miserably his forebears performed in Moravia.

Background

Jaroslav ze Šternberka was a Czech nobleman (probably fictive) who is said to have won a battle against the Mongols by Hostýn in 1241.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Tak ty seš tedy Tatar,“ soustrastně řekl Švejk, „ty jsi se vydařil. Pak mně máš rozumět a já tobě, když seš Tatar. Hm - znáš Jaroslava ze Šternberka? To jméno neznáš, ty kluku tatarská? Ten vám natřel prdel pod Hostýnem.

Literature

Muhlahalej Abdrachmanovnn flag
Google search

Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „To mně nikdo nebude věřit,“ pomyslil si Švejk, „že se někdy někdo moh tak jmenovat jako ti Tataři kolem: Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov - Bejmurat Allahali - Džeredže Čerdedže - Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev atd.

Also written:Муглагалей Абдрахманов ru

Bejmurat Allahalinn flag
Google search

Bejmurat Allahali was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „To mně nikdo nebude věřit,“ pomyslil si Švejk, „že se někdy někdo moh tak jmenovat jako ti Tataři kolem: Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov - Bejmurat Allahali - Džeredže Čerdedže - Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev atd.

Also written:Беймурат Аллагали ru

Džeredže Čerdedženn flag
Google search

Džeredže Čerdedže was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport, a Georgian to judge by the name.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „To mně nikdo nebude věřit,“ pomyslil si Švejk, „že se někdy někdo moh tak jmenovat jako ti Tataři kolem: Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov - Bejmurat Allahali - Džeredže Čerdedže - Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev atd.

Also written:Джередже Чердедже ru

Davlatbalej Nurdagalejevnn flag
Google search

Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „To mně nikdo nebude věřit,“ pomyslil si Švejk, „že se někdy někdo moh tak jmenovat jako ti Tataři kolem: Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov - Bejmurat Allahali - Džeredže Čerdedže - Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev atd.

Also written:Давлатбалей Нурдагалеев ru

Farář Vobejdann flag
Google search

Vobejda was the priest in Židohoušť who Švejk thought had a somewhat easier name than Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] To mně nikdo nebude věřit,“ pomyslil si Švejk, „že se někdy někdo moh tak jmenovat jako ti Tataři kolem: Muhlahalej Abdrachmanov - Bejmurat Allahali - Džeredže Čerdedže - Davlatbalej Nurdagalejev atd. To u nás máme přeci lepší jména, jako ten farář v Židohoušti, kterej se jmenoval Vobejda.
Allāhnn flag
Wikipedia czdeennnnoru Google search
feldimam.jpg

Allāh's representative on earth: a k.u.k Feldimam in Karlín

© Milan Hodík

Allāh is metioned by the Crimean tatar Švejk talks to in Dobromil. He uses the term "Alláhu-Akbar" (God is great).

Background

Allāh is the Arab word for God and is commonly used in the context of Islam. The conception of Allah is very close to judaism's Jahve and the Christian God, which is natural as these religions have common roots.

In Austria-Hungary Islam joined the varied spectrum of religions when Bosnia-Hercegovina became part of the empire. In k.u.k Militärseelsorge the Feldiman had his recognised place next to the Feldkurat and the Feldrabbiner.

The author had himself extensive knowledge of muslim peoples in Russia, mostly from his stays in Tatarstan and Bashkortostan in 1918 and 1919. Another possible source of knowledge: according to his wife Alexandra Lvova (as retold by Franta Sauer), he employed a group of body-guards from the muslim region of Cherkessia during his stay in Irkutsk in 1920.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Ne ponymat, já krymsky Tatárin, Allah achper.“ Tatar sedl si, zkříživ nohy, na zem, složiv ruce na hruď, začal se modlit: „Allah achper - Allah achper - bezmila - arachman - arachim - málinkin mustafír.“
Löfler, Hansnn flag
Google search

Hans Löfler was a cripple from Styria who was routinely humiliated by the corporal who interrogated Švejk in Dobromil after he was captured trying on a Russian uniform. Hans Löfler was ordered to crawl around on the floor with a pipe in his mouth, then he had to bark like a dog.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Otevřel dveře do vedlejší místnosti a zavolal: „Hans Löfler!“ Ozvalo se „Hier!“ a dovnitř vstoupil volatý voják, Štajeráček, s výrazem ubrečeného kreténa. To byla na etapě holka pro všecko.
Džindralej Hanemalejnn flag
Google search

Džindralej Hanemalej was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Zas chodil dál vystrojenými řadami zajatců, kteří postupně vykřikovali svá jména a příjmení: „Džindralej Hanemalej - Babamulej Mirzahali“ atd.

Also written:Джидралей Ганемалей ru

Babamulej Mirzahalinn flag
Google search

Babamulej Mirzahali was one of the prisoners in Švejk's transport.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Zas chodil dál vystrojenými řadami zajatců, kteří postupně vykřikovali svá jména a příjmení: „Džindralej Hanemalej - Babamulej Mirzahali“ atd.

Also written:Бабамулей Мирзагали ru

Štěpánek, Bohuslavnn flag
Google search

Bohuslav Štěpánek was much easier than tatar names like Babamulej Mirzahali according to Švejk. He was very likely a real person.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Že si nepřekousneš jazyk,“ říkal každému z nich s dobráckým úsměvem Švejk. „Jestlipak to není lepší, když se u nás jmenuje někdo Bohuslav Štěpánek, Jaroslav Matoušek nebo Růžena Svobodová.“
Matoušek, Jaroslavnn flag
*18.12.1872 Praha - †30.3.1946 Praha
Google search
matousek.jpg

Matoušek on vampires

Jaroslav Matoušek was according to Švejk preferable to be called rather than these Tatar names like Babamulej Mirzahali.

Background

Jaroslav Matoušek is not directly identifiable but the author almost certainly borrowed the name from a real person. Antonín Měšťan identifies him as a translator of mythical prose. The person he has in mind was an expert on Gnosticism and Hermeticism, wrote books on the theme and also translated neo-platonic prose.

The most visible trace of him is a book from 1924 on the philosopher Jakub Böhme, which is still widely available. The catalogue of the Czech National Library lists four titles (two of them translations from Greek) by him, published from 1922 to 1925. It is therefore probable that Jaroslav Hašek knew about Jaroslav Matoušek when he wrote those lines at the end of 1922. All four books were reprinted in the 1990's. In 1927 he wrote another book, this time about vampires.

Jaroslav Matoušek seems to have been a spare time author. Police records shows that he was a civil cervant in the k.k. post- and telegraph authorities. He was married to Marie Kalinova from Vršovice and in 1914 the couple lived in Prague IV, čp. 112 (Hradčany).

Antonín Měšťan

Jaroslav Matoušek war hauptsächlich als Übersetzer mystischer Schriften tätig.

NKČR

Narozen 18.12.1872 v Praze, zemřel 30.3.1946 v Praze. PhDr., práce z okultismu, překlady novoplatoniků.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Že si nepřekousneš jazyk,“ říkal každému z nich s dobráckým úsměvem Švejk. „Jestlipak to není lepší, když se u nás jmenuje někdo Bohuslav Štěpánek, Jaroslav Matoušek nebo Růžena Svobodová.“

Literature

Svobodová, Růženann flag
*10.7.1868 Mikulovice - †1.1.1920 Praha
Wikipedia czdeen Google search
svobodova.jpg

Český svět, 12.7.1918

Růžena Svobodová was according to Švejk much easier to pronounce than Tatar names like Babamulej Mirzahali.

Background

Růžena Svobodová was a Czech writer who specialised in literature on the fate of women. She is vaguely classed as impressionist.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Že si nepřekousneš jazyk,“ říkal každému z nich s dobráckým úsměvem Švejk. „Jestlipak to není lepší, když se u nás jmenuje někdo Bohuslav Štěpánek, Jaroslav Matoušek nebo Růžena Svobodová.“

Literature

Babula Hallejenn flag
Google search

Babula Halleje is an invented name, this time by the author.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Když konečně Švejk po hrozném utrpení sepsal všechny ty Babula Halleje, Chudži Mudži, umínil si, že to zkusí ještě jednou a vysvětlí tlumočníkovi-šikovatelovi, že se stal obětí omylu, a jak už několikrát po cestě, když ho hnali mezi zajatci, marně se dovolával spravedlnosti.
Chudži Mudžinn flag
Google search

Chudži Mudži is an invented name, this time by the author.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Když konečně Švejk po hrozném utrpení sepsal všechny ty Babula Halleje, Chudži Mudži, umínil si, že to zkusí ještě jednou a vysvětlí tlumočníkovi-šikovatelovi, že se stal obětí omylu, a jak už několikrát po cestě, když ho hnali mezi zajatci, marně se dovolával spravedlnosti.
Dreger, Karolinann flag
Google search

Karolina Dreger is a name the drunk corporal who interrogated Švejk sings about to the tones of Loreley. He picks the lyrics from a newspaper advert.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Přebubnovával si na židli na nápěv „Ich weiß nicht, was soll es bedeuten...“ nový inserát: „Karolina Dreger, porodní babička, doporučuje se ct. dámám v každém případě.“
Major Wolfnn flag
Google search

Wolf was the major in Przemyśl who discovered that Švejk was a Czech in a Russian uniform. He advocated immediate hanging of the delinquent, preferably after a summary trial.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Potom je přejímal major Wolf, vládnoucí tou dobou nad všemi zajatci pracujícími na opravách v pevnosti Přemyšlu a okolí. To byl důkladný člověk. Měl u sebe celý štáb tlumočníků, kteří vybírali ze zajatců specialisty ku stavbám podle jejich schopností a předběžného vzdělání.
Professor Masaryk, Tomáš Garriguenn flag
*7.3.1850 Hodonín - †14.9.1937 Lány
Wikipedia czdeennnnosk Google search
masaryk.png

"Hochverräterische Umtriebe von österr. Čechen im Auslande". K.k. Polizeidirektion, Prag, 1917

Masaryk is mentioned by the author in connection with a discussion about Czechs who have joined the enemy. Masaryk is referred to as the former Austrian professor who has moved abroad and is involved in anti-Austrian agitation. The author's personal greeting to the president was removed from editions from 1951 and 1955.

Background

Masaryk was a Czech politician and professor of philosophy who is strongly linked to the creation of the Czechoslovak state. He was president of the country from 1918 until 1935. He enjoyed enormous respect both at home and abroad and rarely has the term "father of the nation" been more appropriate.

Until 1914 he was a member of parliament (see Parlament) and was still loyal to Austria-Hungary, but his experience from the time after the outbreak of war made him change his mind and work for full Czech/Slovak independence. In December 1914 he moved abroad and started to campaign for an independent Czechoslovak state amongst allied politicians, influential press people, and other people in important positions. He soon became the leader of the Czech (and Slovak) independence movement abroad and during the war he spent time in Switzerland, France, England, USA and Russia. In his position in the independence movement he enjoyed almost unchallenged authority.

Masaryk spent almost a year in Russia at the time when Hašek was there: he arrived in Petrograd on 16 May 1917 and left again in March 1918. The two very probably met; in Berezno (HQ of Hašek's regiment from 11 August 1917) and in Kiev in February 1918. During his visit in Berezno in August 1917 Masaryk stayed in the mansion where Hašek worked. The author was at the time secretary of the staff of the 1st Czechoslovak rifle regiment.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Rakouské ministerstvo vnitra tápalo ještě ve tmách, pokud se týkalo zjištění nějaké bojovné organisace z přeběhlíků na ruskou stranu. Neznalo ještě nic určitého o revolučních organisacích v cizině a teprve v srpnu na linii Sokal - Milijatin - Bubnovo obdrželi velitelé batalionů důvěrné reserváty, že bývalý rakouský profesor Masaryk utekl za hranice, kde vede proti Rakousku propagandu. Nějaký pitomeček od divise doplnil reservát ještě tímto rozkazem: „V případě zachycení předvésti neprodleně k štábu divise!“ Toto tedy připomínám panu presidentovi, aby věděl, jaké nástrahy a léčky byly na něho kladeny mezi Sokalem - Milijatinem a Bubnovou.

SourcesTomáš Masaryk: Světova revoluce (1925). Josef Kopta, František Langer, Rudolf Medek: Od Zborova k Bachmači (1938)

Literature

Kloboučník Vašáknn flag
Google search

Vašák was a hatter that always made trouble at Na Zavadilce in Libeň. The guests and the landlord therefore discussed if they were to thrown him out at first sight or wait until he'd had a few beers and had spent some money.

Background

Vašák was possibly inspired by a real person (or two). A certain Jan Vašák, born in Bukovany by Benešov on 17 September 1871 was a hatter who lived in Žižkov from 1907 and at least until 1909. But even more striking is the fact that he in 1906 lived in Prague VIII čp. 524, i.e. in Libeň. He had got married in Karlín in 1898 so he had probably spent a few years in the area. His wife was from Žižkov.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] To jsme se vám jednou v hospodě ,Na Zavadilce’ v Libni hádali mezi sebou, jestli máme nějakýho kloboučníka Vašáka, kerej vždycky dělal při zábavě neplechu, vyhodit, hned jak se vobjeví ve dveřích, nebo ho vyhodit, až si dá pivo, zaplatí a dopije, nebo mu vyndat boty, až přetančí první kolo.

SourcesJaroslav Šerák

Literature

Znamenáčeknn flag
Google search

Znamenáček is mentioned in Švejk's imaginary anecdote about the judge who went mad and wanted to hang Znamenáček immediately because he had insulted the chaplain kaplan Hortík.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Nějakej Znamenáček řekl kaplanovi Hortíkovi, kerej při náboženství nafackoval jeho klukovi, když ho potkal na ulici: ,Vy vole, ty černá potvoro, ty nábožnej blbečku, ty černý prase, ty farní kozle, ty przniteli učení Kristova, ty pokrytče a šarlatáne v kutně!’
Kaplan Hortíknn flag
Google search

Hortík was the chaplain in Švejk's anecdote about the mad judge. See Znamenáček.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Nějakej Znamenáček řekl kaplanovi Hortíkovi, kerej při náboženství nafackoval jeho klukovi, když ho potkal na ulici: ,Vy vole, ty černá potvoro, ty nábožnej blbečku, ty černý prase, ty farní kozle, ty przniteli učení Kristova, ty pokrytče a šarlatáne v kutně!’
Dozorce Horáčeknn flag
Google search

Horáček was the guard in the anecdote about the mad judge. See Znamenáček.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Proti rozsudku není odvolání. Pane Horáček!’ zavolal potom na dozorce, ,vezmou tady tohodle pána a pověsejí ho tam, vědí, kde se klepají koberce, a potom sem přijdou, dostanou na pivo!’ To se rozumí, že pan Znamenáček i ten dozorce zůstali stát jako zkoprnělí, ale on si na ně dup a rozkřikl se: ,Poslechnou, nebo ne!’
Týneckýnn flag
Google search

Týnecký is the centre of the anecdote Švejk uses against the Polish spy who enters his cell in Przemyśl.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Voni se museli rozhodně napít bahnitý vody,“ řekl Švejk. „jako ten mladej Týneckej od nás, člověk jinak rozumnej, ale jednou se pustil na cesty a dostal se až do Italie. Taky vo ničem jiným nemluvil než vo tej Italii, že jsou tam samý bahnitý vody a nic jinýho památnýho.

Also written:Týneckej Švejk

Saint Peternn flag
*Betsaida - †64/67 Roma
Wikipedia czdeennnno Google search

Saint Peter is the centre of the anecdote Švejk uses against the spy who enters his cell in Przemyśl.

Background

Saint Peter (Simon Peter) was a leader of the early Christian Church, who features prominently in the New Testament through the Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles. He was one of Christ's twelve disciples. The Catholic Church regards him as the first bishop of Rome and also the first pope.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] A taky dostal z tý bahnitý vody zimnici. Chytalo ho to čtyřikrát do roka. Na Všechny svatý, na svatého Josefa, na Petra a Pavla a na Nanebevstoupení panny Marie.

Also written:Svatý Petr cz Sankt Peter de

Saint Paulnn flag
*10 Tarsus - †67 Roma
Wikipedia czdeenno Google search
paulus.jpg

St Paul as El Greco saw him

Saint Paul is the mentioned in the anecdote Švejk uses against the spy who enters his cell in Przemyśl.

Background

Saint Paul (Paul of Tarsos, born Saul) was a Greek Jew who became one of the early Christian leaders and one of the first missionaries. He is often mentioned in the New Testament and has written part of it. Paul was executed in Rome during the reign of emperor Nero.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] A taky dostal z tý bahnitý vody zimnici. Chytalo ho to čtyřikrát do roka. Na Všechny svatý, na svatého Josefa, na Petra a Pavla a na Nanebevstoupení panny Marie.

Also written:Svatý Pavel cz

Leutnant Zimmernn flag
Google search

Zimmer was a lieutenant that Švejk talks about to the spy who enters his cell in Przemyśl.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] My padneme za císaře pána a jeho rodinu, za kterou jsme vybojovali Hercegovinu. Z našich kostí se bude vyrábět špodium pro cukrovary, vo tom už nám před lety vykládal pan lajtnant Zimmer. ,Vy svinská bando,’ povídá, ,vy nevzdělaní kanci, vy zbytečný, indolentní vopice, vy těma haxnama pletete, jako by neměly žádnou cenu.
Bookbinder Božetěch, Josefnn flag
Google search

Božetěch was a bookbinder from Příčná ulice no. 16 who had taken a bath in Zbraslav with a tramp, and the latter had run off with his clothes. This is what Švejk tells during interrogation in Przemyśl. It also transpirers that BožetěchJ read all the books he bound, and was happy to sit at U Fleků and relate the content.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] „Vím, vod 91. regimentu mne už jistě hledají, ale jestli dovolíte, pane majore, malou poznámku vo tom, jak se lidi dobrovolně převlíkají do cizích šatů. Roku 1908 někdy v červenci koupal se knihař Božetěch z Příčný ulice v Praze na Zbraslavi ve starým rameni Berounky.
General Fink von Finkensteinnn flag
Google search

Fink was a general who was commander of the garrison in Przemyśl and led the trial against Švejk. His great joy was to arrange summary trials and he had a strong dislike for defence lawyers. A succesful trial should be quick and the accused should preferably be strung up within three hours. Fink is such a patriot that he even ignores his Reichsdeutsche allies. It is revealed that he lives in Vienna, is married and has a son FinkW.

Background

This figure is unlikely to have been directly modelled on a real person as the fortress commander of Przemyśl from 9 June 1915 (at the latest) was Generalmajor Gustav Stowasser.

According to Radko Pytlík [5] Fink was a real person (documents about him exist in the Vienna war archive), but it is more likely that the author borrowed the name from the well-known Prussian noble family Finck von Finckenstein.

The name Fink von Finkenstein can not be found in address books from Vienna of 1914 and 1915, although the surname Fink was quite common. Nor is he listed in any Kriegsgliederungen from 1915. We must therefore assume that this figure is a grotesque charicature with a random name, but still one that may have borrowed traits from people the author actually met.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Potom pokračoval tento podivný soud na způsob náhlého soudu, který aranžoval předsedající generál Fink von Finkenstein. Tento generál říkával, že žádných auditorů nepotřebuje, že to sezve dohromady a za tři hodiny že každý chlap musí viset. Dokud byl na frontě, tak u něho o náhlý soud nikdy nebyla nouze.

Sources: Österreich-Ungarns Letzter Krieg, Band III.

Literature

Fink, Wilhelmnn flag
Google search

Fink was the son of Fink, mentioned in a letter from the front. The author uses the Czech pet names Vilouš and Viloušek, an equivalent to the German Willi, Willy or Willichen.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Připadalo mně to tak směšné, že jsem všem odpustil, kteří ho hlídali, a ještě jsem udělal vtip, že se ten učitel patrně sám šel poohlédnout po nějakém stromě. Tak vidíš, má drahá, že se zde nijak nenudíme, a řekni malému Viloušovi, že ho tatínek líbá a že mu brzo pošle živého Rusa, na kterém bude Viloušek jezditi jako na koníčkovi.
Feldkurat Martinec, Jannn flag
Google search

Martinec was field chaplain at the Przemyśl garrison and a good Christian from near Nový Jičín in Moravia. After joining k.u.k. Heer his moral standards started to deteriorate. Under the influence of General Fink he got into the habit of enjoying drink and the company of loose women.

His task in the novel is to provide spiritual consolation for Švejk before the impending execution. He never achieved this objective as the good soldier drowned him in endless anecdotes.

His first name Jan appears in the diminutive form Jeníček.

Background

In 1914 there was no Martinec serving in k.u.k. Heer or k.k. Landwehr according to Schematismus. Nor has it been possible to identify any parish priest Martinec who lived at the time.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Polní kurát Martinec představoval si, že jsa ve službách duchovní útěchy raněným a umírajícím na bojišti, vykoupí i hříchy svého zpustlého faráře, který vraceje se v noci domů, nesčíslněkráte ho vzbudil a vypravoval mu: „Jeníčku, Jeníčku! Macatá děvka - to je můj celý život.“
von Hindenburg, Paulnn flag
*2.10.1847 Posen (Poznań) - †2.8.1934 Neudeck (Ogrodzieniec)
Wikipedia czdeenno Google search

Hindenburg is mentioned by the author in passing; he refers to some idiotic booklets published for the army by Lustige Blätter. General Fink finds them entertaining enough to pass them on to Feldkurat Martinec.

Background

Hindenburg was a German general who was Commander in Chief of the German forces on the Eastern front at the time of the events in the novel. From 1916 he became head of the entire German army and gradually became the most influential person in the country.

He was elected president of Germany in 1925, a position he had also when Hitler assumed power in 1933, and he remained in office until his death the year after. He is the only German head of state ever who has been directly elected by the people. Politically he was regarded as conservative.

Hašek here refers to issue no. 2 of the series Illustrierter Tornister-Humor, published by Lustige Blätter from February 1915 and onwards.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Měl celou knihovnu takových svazečků s pitomými názvy jako „Humor v tornistře pro oči i uši“, „Hindenburgovy anekdoty“, „Hindenburg v zrcadle humoru“, „Druhá tornistra plná humoru, naládovaná Felixem Schlemprem“, „Z našeho gulášového kanonu“, „Šťavnaté granátové třísky ze zákopů“, nebo tyto hovadiny: „Pod dvojitým orlem“, „Vídeňský řízek z c. k. polní kuchyně. Ohřál Artur Lokesch“.

Literature

Schloemp, Felixnn flag
*5.9.1880 Leipzig - †23.8.1916 Malinadr?
Wikipedia de Google search
schloemp1.jpg

Oesterreichisch-ungarische Buchhändler-Correspondenz, 15.9.1915.

schloemp.png

Prager Tagblatt, 2.9.1916.

schloemp1.png

Lustige Blätter, 1.9.1916.

Schloemp is mentioned by the author in passing; he refers to some idiotic booklets published for the army by Lustige Blätter. General Fink finds them entertaining enough to pass them on to Feldkurat Martinec.

Background

Schloemp (i romanen Schlemper) was a German book trader, editor and publisher. From 1909 onwards he published a number of illustrated humorous books.

In 1915 he contributed to Tornister-Humor, a series of humorous propaganda booklets that were published by Lustige Blätter. Installments no. 1, 2, 3, 8 and 15 are directly mentioned in The Good Soldier Švejk.[a]

Some time in late 1915 or early 1916 Schloemp was called up for service. Little about his military exploits is known until he was wounded at the Russian front on 25 July 1916. Two days later he was in person awarded the Eiserne Kreuz (Iron Cross) by Prince Leopold of Bavaria. Some weeks later Schloemp died from the injuries and was buried by Malinadr on 23 August. In official loss lists for Prussia he was first reported severely wounded on 16 August, then dead on 7 October. It is also revealed that he served in Reserve-Infanterie-Regiment 48, 9. Kompagnie.

Malinadr was according to Lustige Blätter the site of his burial but it has not been possible to locate it. Presumably it is a mis-spelling (or rather an erroneous transcription) of some place name in current Belarus. Fortunately the history of his regiment[b] is available and it reveals that on 25 July 1916 they were attacked by Skrobava (Скробава) north of Baranovichi (Баранавічы). That day the regiment suffered 15 soldiers killed and 46 wounded. We must assume that the severely wounded Schloemp was brought to a field hospital behind the lines but exactly where this "Malinadr" is remains an enigma.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Měl celou knihovnu takových svazečků s pitomými názvy jako „Humor v tornistře pro oči i uši“, „Hindenburgovy anekdoty“, „Hindenburg v zrcadle humoru“, „Druhá tornistra plná humoru, naládovaná Felixem Schlemprem“, „Z našeho gulášového kanonu“, „Šťavnaté granátové třísky ze zákopů“, nebo tyto hovadiny: „Pod dvojitým orlem“, „Vídeňský řízek z c. k. polní kuchyně.

Sources: Andrew Lucas

Also written:Felix Schlemper Hašek

Literature

References
a"Tornister-Humor" and "The Good Soldier Švejk"Jomar Hønsi10.5.2020
bReserve-Infanterie-Regiment Nr. 48Walter Schackert1925
Lokesch, Arthurnn flag
*23.3.1878 Praha - †?
Google search
lokesch2.png

Oesterreichisch-ungarische Buchhändler-Correspondenz, 2.2.1916.

lokesch5.png

Berliner Adreßbuch, 1909.

lokesch4.png

Národní politika, 3.3.1910.

lokesch3.png

Kulturní Adresař ČSR, 1934.

lokesch6.png

Pražský adresář 1937-1938.

Artur Lokesch is mentioned by the author in passing; he refers to some idiotic booklets published for the army by Lustige Blätter. General Fink finds them entertaining enough to pass them on to Feldkurat Martinec.

Background

Artur Lokesch was a writer who from 1915 onwards contributed to the series Tornister-Humor published by Lustige Blätter. The novel specifically refers to Unter'm Doppeladler which was issue No. 15 in the series[1]. The adverts added the explanatory notes Wiener Schnitzel aus der k. k. Feldküche, aufgewärmt von Arthur Lokesch and Hašek probably was inspired by these adverts rather than the booklets themselves. Artur Lokesch also contributed to several other of these 64-page booklets.

1. Instalment no. 15 seems to have been published in late 1915 so Jaroslav Hašek could therefore not have drawn inspiration from his own time in k.u.k. Heer.

The author of this and other humorous booklets was the youngest son of Prague factory owner Eduard Lokesch. His factory in Holešovice manufactured buttons, garments and other clothing accessories. Artur Lokesch was born in 1878, at the time the family lived in Praha I./859 (Kozí plácek). At the time the factory/work shop was also located here and according to Egon Erwin Kisch a certain Mestek worked there for a short period!

Artur Lokesch graduated from the German commercial academy in Prague in 1898. From police records it transpires that he in 1906 and this fits well with the 1906 year-book of the comercial academy who reveals the he was chief editor of Rheinisch-Westphälischen Anzeige in Essen. In the same records he is listed as "disponent" (managing clerk). In 1910 he is mentioned in Národní politika as a "well known German editor". He wrote lyrics for songs in theatre plays that from 1912 were performed in Berlin and later across Europe. His most famous contribution is the lyrics of the internationally known vaudeville Der Regimentspapa (1914). He also contributed to Prager Tagblatt, using the pseudonym Tuxl.

Artur Lokesch moved to Berlin some time before 1909 and was as late as 1933 listed in the city's address book. He is known to have edited Der Luftballon, a magazine that in 1909 was located in the same building as Lustige Blätter. Both publications were owned by Dr. Eysler & Co.

His name is found in address books and in newspapers also after the war. He is now listed as an editor and dramaturgist and his name appears as far away as Essen (editor in chief of Rheinisch-Westphälischen Anzeiger). The Artur Lokesch family were Jewish but Arthur converted to protestantism as a young man.

In 1937 he was again living in Prague so he had obviously left Berlin after the 1933 Nazi takeover. He doesn't figure in the address book from 1942, but it has so far not been possible to determine if he emigrated or became a victim of Holocaust. He is in any case not on the list of Czech victims.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] ... nebo tyto hovadiny: „Pod dvojitým orlem“, „Vídeňský řízek z c. k. polní kuchyně. Ohřál Artur Lokesch“. Někdy mu také předzpěvoval ze sbírky veselých vojenských písní „Wir müssen siegen!“

Literature

Ignatius of Loyolann flag
*24.10.1491 Azpeitia - †31.7.1556 Roma
Wikipedia czdeenesno Google search

Ignatius of Loyola is mentioned in passing in the description of Feldkurat Martinec.

Background

Ignatius of Loyola was a Basque/Spanish nobleman and soldier known for having founded the Jesuit Order in 1534 and also the instigator of the inquisition. He was declared a saint in 1622. The church Kostel svátého Ignáce is named after him.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Generál oblíbil si kuráta Martince, který se mu prvně představil jako nějaký svatý Ignác z Loyoly a pomalu přizpůsoboval se generálovu okolí.

Also written:Ignác z Loyoly cz Ignacio de Loyola es

Mr. Grabowskinn flag
*2.12.1822 Lwów - †30.3.1908 Przemyśl
Wikipedia czpl Google search
dworski.png

Národní listy, 26.5.1883

dworski.jpg

The family tomb of Aleksander Dworski in Przemyśl

Grabowski is mentioned because Feldkurat Martinec kneeled in front of his statue to confess his sins. Grabowski was according to the author mayor of Przemyśl in the 1880's and did the city great services, was a builder and a benefactor.

Background

Grabowski was according to Milan Hodík identical to Bronisław Grabowski, a Polish ethnographer, writer, translator and slavist. He translated, amongst others, the Czech writers Karolina Světlá and Vrchlický.

Radko Pytlík makes no assumptions about Grabowski's identity, and quotes Polish sources that there was no such statue in Przemyśl at the time. He suggests there might be a mix-up with a statue of Adam Mickiewicz that was indeed located in the city park (where the author placed the Grabowski monument).

Aleksander Dworski

The author's additional facts are however sufficient to make us conclude that it was a mix-up of names. The mayor of Przemyśl from 1881 to 1901 was Aleksander Dworski and his biographical details fit well with information from The Good Soldier Švejk. No statue of him can be located, but he was (and is) well known in the city and a major street is named after him. Dworski and not Grabowski was thus obviously the man the author had in mind.

Dworski was born in Lwów and graduated as a doctor of law from the city's university in 1849. He entered politics early, serving as MP for Lwów and Grodek in Reichsrat from 1873 until 1880, where protocols reveal that he was very active. He was known as a Polish patriot and pan-slavist. Thereafter he served for 20 years as mayor of Przemyśl, the city he had lived in from 1855. His reign oversaw substantial development - building of schools, sewers and beginning electrification. Already in 1896 he was named honorary citizen and a street was renamed in his honour. From 1889 to 1901 he was also member of the Galician parliament. Dworski died in 1908 from pneumonia.

Quote(s) from the novel
[4.1] Potom dlouhou dobu vyčítal si toto zpustlé jednání, ačkoliv to nemohl ani napraviti tím, když tu noc, vraceje se domů, klečel omylem v parku před sochou stavitele a starosty města, mecenáše pána Grabowského, který získal si velké zásluhy o Přemyšl v letech osmdesátých.

Sources: Kurjer Lwowski, Milan Hodík, Radko Pytlík

Also written:Grabowský Hašek

Literature

Index Back Forward IV. The famous thrashing continued Hovudpersonen

1. Švejk in the transport of russian prisoners of war


© 2009 - 2021 Jomar Hønsi Last updated: 29.7.2021