Hovudpersonen

The Good Soldier Švejk

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The novel The Good Soldier Švejk refers to a number of institutions and firms, public as private. These have until 15 September 2013 been categorised as 'Places'. This only partly makes sense as this type of entity can not be always be accosiated with fixed geographical point, in the way that for instance cities, montains and rivers can. This new page contains military and civilian institutions (including army units, regiments etc), hotels, public houses, newspapers and magazines.

The line between this page and "Places" is blurred, but the idea with this section is to include entities that are not necessarily located on a fixed spot on earth. Therefore Prague and Vienna will still be found in the "Places" database, because these have constant co-ordinates. On the other hand institutions may change location: K.u.k. Heer and U kalicha are not unequivocal geographical terms so they will from now on appear on this page.

>> The Good Soldier Švejk index of institutions mentioned in the novel (174) Show all
>> I. In the rear
Index Back Forward I. In the rear Hovudpersonen

10. Švejk as a military servant to the field chaplain

Česká strana národně sociálnínn flag
Školská ulice 1741/10, Praha II.-Filip Dub [1910]
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narsoc1.png

The first party newspaper, one month after the party was founded

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Adresář 1910

Česká strana národně sociální is is indirectly mentioned when one of the soldiers in Švejk's escort on way from Hradčany to Karlín asks him if he is a national socialist.

Background

Česká strana národně sociální was a nationalistic and socialist party that was founded in April 1897 as a break-away group from the social democrats. Party chairman in the period up to the outbreak of war was Klofáč. At the 1911 election to Parlament they achieved 9.7 per cent of the votes in Bohemia and had 15 representatives. In Moravia the party was much weaker and had only one representative.

In the whole period until 1914 Klofáč was party chairman. The term "nacional socialist" was used in day-to-day speech even then, but was not related to the notorious NSDAP that emerged in Germany after the war. In 1918 the party was renamed the Czechoslovak Socialist Party and in 1926 even the National Socialist Party! Their best known public profile after 1914 is without doubt Edvard Beneš.

The party's official newspaper from 1906 was České Slovo, a paper for which Jaroslav Hašek briefly worked as a local news reporter in 1912. He wrote for the paper already in 1908, and during the first half of 1921 several of his stories were printed in the evening issue Večerní České Slovo. After the author's death the paper played a vital role in popularising his novel. It was their evening issue that published Josef Lada's famous drawings. These were to colour our perception of Švejk even until today. In 1924 the paper printed the first serious study of the novel. See Jan Morávek for more details.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.1] „Nejsi národní socialista?“ Nyní počal být malý tlustý opatrným. Vmísil se do toho. „Co je nám do toho,“ řekl, „je všude plno lidí a pozorujou nás. Aspoň kdybychom někde v průjezdu mohli sundat bodla, aby to tak nevypadalo. Neutečeš nám?

Also written:Czech National Social Party en Tschechische national-soziale Partei de Det tsjekkiske nasjonalsosiale parti no

Na Kuklíkunn flag
Petrské nám. 1130/6, Praha II-Vilém Srp [1910]
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kuklik2.png

Národní listy, 20.5.1901

Na Kuklíku was the tavern where Švejk and his guards had a long and happy break before they, under the influence, continued to feldkurát Katz in Karlín. A certain Serabona is reported to be the landlord, and as a member of Sokol he can be trusted.

Background

Na Kuklíku was a restaurant in Prague at Petrské náměstí. Newspaper adverts from 1877 reveal that the pub existed and that they also brewed their own beer. Towards the end of the 1880s brewing appears to have ceased, but the restaurant business continued.

Vilém Srp took over in 1901 and was in 1923 still the owner. That year a newspaper report reveals that treasures worth Kč 50,000 had been hidden in the loft but had been stolen at a time when the landlord couple were ill. The culprits were caught and sentenced. It is interesting that a postcard from 1906 reveals that the place was also called U Serabono. See Serabona. The building was demolished in 1928.

Kuklík is mentioned in a story by E.E. Kisch: Zitaten vom Montmartre where it is described as a rough place. Over the years several reports of disturbances appeared in the newspapers. There were several incidents involving unruly soldiers, and reported cases of theft and a gang cheating at cards.

Links

Source: Jaroslav Šerák, M. Smreček

Quote from the novel
[1.10.1] „Pojďme na Kuklík,“ vybízel Švejk, „kvéry si dáte do kuchyně, hostinský Serabona je Sokol, toho se nemusíte bát. Hrajou tam na housle a na harmoniku,“ pokračoval Švejk, „a chodějí tam pouliční holky a různá jiná dobrá společnost, která nesmí do Represenťáku.“ Čahoun s malým podívali se ještě jednou na sebe a pak řekl čahoun: „Tak tam půjdem, do Karlína je ještě daleko.“ Po cestě jim Švejk vypravoval různé anekdoty a v dobré náladě vstoupili na „Kuklík“ a udělali to tak, jak Švejk radil. Ručnice uschovali v kuchyni a šli do lokálu, kde housle a harmonika naplňovaly místnost zvuky oblíbené písně "Na Pankráci".
Sokolnn flag
Ferdinandova tř. 61/24, Praha II-Josef E. Scheiner [1910]
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Sokol exercise at Lipnice nad Sázavou castle, some time before 1913

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Národní listy, 30.11.1915

Sokol is briefly mentioned by Švejk when he tells his escort on the way to Katz that the landlord Serabona at Na Kuklíku is a Sokol member and thus no reason to be afraid of. They could without worry leave their rifles in the kitchen and have a drink.

Background

Sokol (Falcon) is a still existing patriotic gymnastics movement founded in Prague in 1862 by Miroslav Tyrš and Jindřich Fügner. They soon became an important part of the Czech national consciousness and also took root amongst other Slav peoples in Austria-Hungary and even in Russia, Serbia and Bulgaria. Throughout the time of the monarchy the authorities kept a close eye on the movement that had strong support from parties that advocated Czech state rights, namely Česká strana národně sociální and Mladočeši. In 1910 the main office was located in Ferdinandova tř. 24, the building has been demolished. The premises are now (2015) occupied by the supermarket Tesco. Scheiner was chairman of both the Czech and the international organisation, and both were located at this address.

On 24 November 1915 the two Prague-based umbrella organisations of Sokol, Česká Obec Sokolská and Svaz Slovanského Sokolstva, were dissolved at the order of the Ministery of Interior. Local organisations were however allowed to function. The official reason for the crackdown was pro-Serbian and pro-Russians activities, anti-Austrian propaganda, and contact with North American Sokol organisation that was very hostile to the ruling dynasty. Sokol leader Scheiner had been arrested already on 25 May. Many Sokol members were indeed active in the Czech resistance movement during the war. Sokol reached its pinnacle during the first republic, but was of course banned by both the Nazis and the Communist.

On 6 January 1923 members of Sokol carried Jaroslav Hašek's coffin to his grave at Lipnice nad Sázavou.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.1] „Pojďme na Kuklík“, vybízel Švejk, „kvéry si dáte do kuchyně, hostinský Serabona je Sokol, toho se nemusíte bát. Hrajou tam na housle a na harmoniku,“ pokračoval Švejk, „a chodějí tam pouliční holky a různá jiná dobrá společnost, která nesmí do Represenťáku.
Reprezenťáknn flag
Josefské nám. 1090/4, Praha I
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Reprezenťák is mentioned when Švejk tells his escort that Na Kuklíku is a pleasant place where street girl and other good company who are not allowed at Reprezenťák may enter.

Background

Reprezenťák is a concert hall and entertainment complex in Prague, now officially called Obecní dům. It was originally known as Reprezentační dům, hence the colloquial term that Švejk uses. It is one of the landmark Art Nouveau buildings in the city. The Czechoslovak independence was proclaimed here on 28 October 1918.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.1] Hrajou tam na housle a na harmoniku,“ pokračoval Švejk, „a chodějí tam pouliční holky a různá jiná dobrá společnost, která nesmí do Represenťáku.“
U Valšůnn flag
ul. Karoliny Světlé 286/22, Praha I-František Materna [1910]
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U Valšů, May 2011

valsu.png

Národní listy, 18.9.1910

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Policejní ředitelstvi, 30.11.1914

U Valšů is referred to in a conversation at Na Kuklíku where it is claimed that a certain Mařka (Marie) had disappeared to U Valšů with a soldier. The place appears again in a story by Švejk on the train after Moson, [III.1].

Background

U Valšů was a coaching inn and hotel in Staré Město, in 1910 owned by Materna. It had long traditions and is mentioned in newspapers as early as 1862. It was still operating in 1917 (the same owner) but seems to have ceased soon after. Today the building is occupied by a theatre and next door is a restaurant and micro-brewery.

U Valšů was the scene of one of the author's most famous hoaxes. On 24 November 1914 Jaroslav Hašek hired a room there, registering as a Russian businessman and was soon arrested. He was taken to Policejní ředitelství, interrogated by Slavíček and sentenced to five days in prison. He claimed that the he did it to check how vigilant the security services were! The story even appeared in the newspapers, including the author's humorous response!

Another version of the story claims that he registered under a name which backwards read "lick my arse", but this is surely nothing more than a "good story" and is not supported by the police records.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.1] U hudby hádali se dva, že nějakou Mařku včera lízla patrola. Jeden to viděl na vlastní oči a druhý tvrdil, že šla s nějakým vojákem se vyspat k „Valšům“ do hotelu.
U Šuhůnn flag
Benediktská ul. 722/9, Praha I-Jan Schuha [1913]
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Hartmut Binder: Wo Kafka und seine Freunde zu Gast waren

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Pobytové přihlášky / Meldebuch

U Šuhů was a brothel where Katz owed money, and subsequently didn't want visit any. The place is mentioned twice more: in Marek's story about the court of Marie Valerie and in the story about the tinsmith Pimpra.

Background

U Šuhů was a brothel in Benediktská 9. According to Chytilův úplný adresář království českého (1913) it was owned by Jan Schuha whom the establishment presumably was named after. In Cecil Parrott's translation of Švejk, a footnote describes U Šuhů as a "notorious brothel".

Kafka at Šuha

Field chaplain Katz and tinsmith Pimpra were not the only notabilities who frequented Šuha. In his diary Franz Kafka discretely mentions a visit on 28 September 1911 when he was served by a "Jewess with a narrow face". He also describes the interior in some detail. The brothel hostess is described in rather unflattering terms.

Kafka expert Hartmut Binder provides interesting information in his book Wo Kafka und seine Freunde zu Gast waren. He reveals that Jan Šuha obtained a brothel's license as a reward for acting as a police informer. It was his wife who managed the brothel, an arrangement that was quite common at the time. It is also revealed that Kafka must have visited more than once. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Šuha married Rudolf Kulhánek, the establishment's bouncer.

Newspaper clips

In a newspaper article from 1891 it is revealed that Šuha was a police informer who contributed to the capture of two thieves who attempted to rob a shop in Michle. The article also states that Šuha was 43 years old so he must have been born in 1848.

Šuha was already in 1896 listed as proprietor of a wine bar at the above mentioned address, and in 1898 a newspaper clip refers to Jan Šuha, owner of a night café in Benedikstká ulice. That year he bought a café in Konviktská ulice in Staré Město. In 1907 (3 April) Architektonický ozbor reported that Šuha had bought house no. 1030 in Benediktská for 96,000 crowns. This was the house on the corner next to the brothel.

In 1923 Národní politika reported of a fight in front of the house, when a drunk man tried to enter a flat because he thought this was where the brothel still was. So Šuha had ceased doing business some time between 1913 and 1923. He had by 1913 reached the age of 65 and in 1919 licensed brothels were made illegal although the ban was later relaxed somewhat.

Police records

The police registration protocols reveal more. They confirm that "Johann Šucha" was born in 1848 and that he in 1901 married the 29 years younger "Marie Wykypěl", in other words the brothel mama who both Marek and Kafka mention. Šuha is listed with two occupations: Goldarbeiter (gold craftsman) and Weinschänker (wine tavern waiter), born and with Heimatrecht in Rakov(?) near Plzeň. On 4 March 1913 they are both entered as residents of Benediktinergasse 722/I. It shuld also be noted that Emilie Rossmann (born Vykypěl, Brno 1887) is entered at the same address. It is tempting to suggest that she may have been the sister of Marie. But all in all it is obvious that Marek and Kafka's bordelmadam was Marie Šuhová and that she was born in 1877.

Franz Kafka, Diaries, 1 October 1911

In B. Suha the day before yesterday. The sole Jewess with a narrow face, continuing in a narrow chin, but with an extensively wavy and broad hair style . The three small doors leading from the interior of the building to the hall. Guests like in a guard house on the stage, drinks on the table, but are hardly touched. The woman with the flat face in a square dress that begins to move only deep down below the seam. Now, as before, some are dressed like puppets for a children’s theatre, as one sells them on the Christmas market, i.e. covered with ruffles and gold and loosely sewn, so that they can be separated in one go and they fall apart between one’s fingers. The hostess with the light blonde and tightly pulled hair, no doubt covering a disgusting foundation, with sharply declining nose, whose direction has some geometric relation to the sagging breasts and the tightly strung belly, complains of headache, which are caused by the fact that today Saturday there was great hype but still nothing happens.

Franz Kafka, Tagebücher, 1. Oktober 1911

Im B. Suha vorvorgestern. Die eine Jüdin mit schmalem Gesicht, besser das in ein schmales Kinn verlauft, aber von einer ausgedehnt welligen Frisur ins Breite geschüttelt wird. Die drei kleinen Türen, die aus dem Innern des Gebäudes in den Salon führen. Die Gäste wie in einer Wachstube auf der Bühne, Getränke auf dem Tisch, werden ja kaum angerührt. Die Flachgsichtige im eckigen Kleid, das erst tief unten in einem Saum sich zu bewegen anfängt. Einige hier und früher angezogen wie die Marionetten für Kinderteater, wie man sie auf dem Christmarkt verkauft d.h. mit Rüschen und Gold beklebt und lose benäht, so daß man sie mit einem Zug abtrennen kann und daß sie einem dann in den Fingern zerfallen. Die Wirtin mit dem mattblonden über zweifellos ekelhaften Unterlagen straff gezogenem Haar, mit der scharf niedergehenden Nase, deren Richtung in irgendeiner geometrischen Beziehung zu den hängenden Brüste und dem steif gehaltenen Bauch steht, klagt über Kopfschmerzen, die dadurch verursacht sind, daß heute Samstag ein so großer Rummel und nichts daran ist.

Links

Source: Franz Kafka, Hartmut Binder, K.L. Kukla, Jaroslav Šerák

Quote from the novel
[1.10.2] Polní kurát pustil se vrat a navalil se na Švejka: „Pojďme tedy někam, ale k Šuhům nepůjdu, tam jsem dlužen.“
[3.3] Kvůli pořádku, aby si snad dvorní lokajové nedovolili nějaké důvěrnosti ku dvorním dámám přítomným na hostině, objevuje se nejvyšší hofmistr baron Lederer, komoří hrabě Bellegarde a vrchní dvorní dáma hraběnka Bombellesová, která hraje mezi dvorními dámami stejnou úlohu jako madam v bordelu u Šuhů.
[3.4] Švejk velice vážně a důrazně řekl: „Nic jste neprováděl, pane lajtnant, byl jste jenom na návštěvě v jednom vykřičeným domě. Ale to byl asi nějakej vomyl. Klempíře Pimpra z Kozího plácku taky vždycky hledali, když šel kupovat plech do města, a našli ho také vždycky v podobnej místnosti, buď u ,Šuhů’, nebo u ,Dvořáků’, jako já vás našel.

Also written:Schuha de

Korpskommandonn flag
Malostranské nám. 258/15, Praha III-K.u.k. Ärar [1914]
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The recruitment area of the 8th Corps

korps8_sokal.png

Korpskommando at Sokal. Signed von Scheuchenstuehl.

Korpskommando is mentioned by Katz in his drunken stupor on the way back from Helmich's party.

Background

Korpskommando here refers to the 8. Armeekorps, one of a total of 16 army groups in Austria-Hungary. The corps, with headquarters in the Lichtenstein Palace in Malá Strana recruited from south, west and central Bohemia. Together with 9. korps (Litoměřice) it covered all of Bohemia.

Subordinated the corps were these units: 9. Infanteriedivision (with IR91), 19. Infanteriedivision, 1. Kavaleriebrigade and 8. Traindivision. Corps commander in 1914 was general Arthur Giesl von Gieslingen. After the fiasco in Serbia in 1914 he was replaced by Viktor von Scheuchenstuel.

Employed in the corps was also the master-spy Alfred Redl, chief of their general staff from 18 October 1912. In May 1913 his activities were uncovered: he had been a spy for Russia for around 10 years. He is regarded as one of the best (worst) spies ever, and handed over whatever existed of value.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.2] Polní kurát, který zaslechl poslední slova, pobručuje si nějaký motiv z operety, kterou by nikdo nepoznal, vztyčil se k divákům: "Kdo je z vás mrtvej, ať se přihlásí u korpskomanda během tří dnů, aby mohla být jeho mrtvola vykropena."
Infanterieregiment Nr. 75nn flag
Salzburg-K.u.k. Ärar [1914]
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Town square in Jindřichův Hradec

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Lehener Kaserne

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Seidels kleines Armeeschema 1914

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Volksfreund, 8.8.1914

Infanterieregiment Nr. 75 is mentioned in passing when the inebriated Katz in the cab home from Helmich mistakes Švejk for colonel Just from the 75th regiment.

The regiment is mentioned again when Katz and Švejk have to borrow a trophy from Witinger for their field mass in [I.11].

Background

Infanterieregiment Nr. 75 was one of 102 Austro-Hungarian infantry regiments. It was founded in 1860 and had their baptism of fire already in 1866 at the second battle of Custoza.

It was a predominantly Czech regiment, recruited from Ergänzungsbezirk Nr. 75, Jindřichův Hradec (Neuhaus). The Ergänzungsbezirkskommando and 3rd battalion were located here in 1914. The staff and the other three battalions had been garrisoned in Salzburg from March 1912. In Salzburg they raised some attention with their Czech songs, and are said to have caused a boom in the local interest in football.

Regimental commander was colonel Franz Wiedstruck. The regiment had previously been moved around; between 1906 and 1909 in Prague, at Hradčany. Then it moved to Jindřichův Hradec where it remained until the 1912 transfer.

During the war

Already on 5 August 1914 the regiment departed for the front against Russia. They were allocated to the 4. Armee and in 1914 the fought mostly in the area between San and Kraków. In the new year they were transferred to the German Süd-Armee and moved to the area east of Munkács.

The regiment remained on the eastern front throughout the war. They received particular attention after the battle of Zborów on 2 July 1917. On this day many of the regiment's soldiers were taken prisoners by the Czechoslovak Brigade (Legions) and accusations of treason led to legal proceedings in Vienna.

Gott strafe England

The regiment is also mentioned in Jaroslav Hašek's polemic story Gott strafe England, (Československý voják - 10 October 1917). In this story the main character Adamička turns insane, is transferred to Infanterieregiment Nr. 75 and is taken prisoner at Zborów. The real Josef Adamička however never served in the regiment - and he was stationed in Belgrade at the time the battle was fought.

Wehrgeschichte Salzburg (Erwin Niedermann):

Auf Wunsch des Erzherzog-Thronfolgers Franz Ferdinand (1863– 1914), der in Blühnbach das Jagdschloß besaß, sollten beim zumeist nur deutschsprachigen Militär in Salzburg aber auch Angehörige einer anderen Sprache des multinationalen und multikulturellen Reiches den (ab 1908) zweijährigen Wehrdienst ableisten, so wie das längst in den anderen Kronländern üblich war. So wurden anstelle der „Rainer“ (es verblieb nur das 4. Bataillon) der Regimentsstab und drei Bataillone des Böhmischen Infanterie-Regimentes Nr. 75 aus Neuhaus/Jindrichuv Hradec (lichtblaue Aufschläge, weiße Knöpfe, 79 Prozent tschechische Umgangssprache, 20 Prozent deutsche,1 Prozent verschiedene) mit März 1912 hierher transferiert, wobei ein Bataillon auch in die Lehener Kaserne kam, die anderen zwei in die Franz Josef-Kaserne, bzw. Hofstall-Kaserne und Nonntalerkaserne, die „Rainer“ in die Hellbrunner-Straße, bzw. auf die Festung. Die Salzburger sollen sehr unverständig erstaunt gewesen sein über die in und außer Dienst gesungenen tschechischen Volkslieder der Soldaten, wie mehrfach überliefert wurde.

Die Soldaten dieses IR 75 sollen bereits vor dem Krieg sich für Fußball interessiert haben. Soldaten dieses Regimentes haben vermutlich den Fußball-Boom in Salzburg ausgelöst. Im Mai 1914 wurde im Rahmen eines Militärsportfestes ein Fußballspiel am Exerziergelände der Hellbrunner-Kaserne abgehalten. Salzburger Realschüler spielten gegen Soldaten des IR 75. Die Realschüler schlossen sich dann zu einem Fußballverein “Die Athletiker” zusammen, aus dem der “Erste Salzburger Athletiker-Klub (1.SAK 1914) entstand. Eine weitere Information dazu spricht von der Landwehr Nr.8 in der Hellbrunner-Kaserne, in der Fußball-Spieler aus den böhmischen Mannschaften SLAVIA und SPARTA als Soldaten Dienst versahen.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.2] Švejk ho vzbudil a za pomoci drožkáře dopravil do drožky. V drožce polní kurát upadl v úplnou otupělost a považoval Švejka za plukovníka Justa od 75. pěšího pluku a několikrát za sebou opakoval: „Nehněvej se, kamaráde, že ti tykám. Jsem prase.“
Sport-Favoritnn flag
Na Přikopě 583/15, Praha I.-Fussballclub Sport-Favorit in Prag [1910]
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sportfav2.png

The club's address in 1910

sportfav1.png

Neues Wiener Tagblatt, 3.7.1902

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Národní Listy, 18.3.1911

Sport-Favorit is mentioned in connected with the running exploits of Witinger. Years ago he had won the trophy that Katz borrowed to use at the field mass and at the time he was running for Sport-Favorit. Later in the chapter it is revealed that the race in question was from Vienna to Mödling.

Background

Sport-Favorit was a sports club from Prague, of German ethnicity, and officially named Fussballclub Sport-Favorit. Despite the name and the main focus on football they also did athletics and cycling, at least during the early years. The club was founded in 1900 by merger between Sport and Favorit. The offices were located on Na Přikopě (Graben), was associated with Café Central, and the football matches were played at Letná. The running competion mentioned in the article to the right took place at a course in Bubny on 13 July 1902.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.2] Tak dostaneme sportovní pohár od nadporučíka Witingra od 75. pluku. On kdysi před lety běhal o závod a vyhrál jej za ,Sport-Favorit’. Byl to dobrý běžec. Dělal čtyřicet kilometrů Vídeň-Mödling za 1 hodinu 48 minut, jak se nám vždycky chlubí. Jsem hovado, že všechno odkládám na poslední chvíli. Proč jsem se, trouba, nepodíval do té pohovky.“
Bruskann flag
Pod Bruskou 132/2, Praha III.-K.u.k. Ärar [1907]
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Bruska was the barracks where captain Šnábl served. Švejk was sent here by Katz to borrow money and to buy ořechovka (nut spirits).

Background

Bruska refers to the now demolished barracks that were located at Klárov in Malá Strana, next to Klárův ústav slepců. They were named after the small (mostly underground) stream Bruska (Brusnice) that flows past the site.

These barracks were the home of the staff of IR28, the 2nd battalion, the replacement area command, and K.u.K. Artillerieregiment Nr. 8. In 1914 the building was sold to the city of Prague and the military personnel were moved to the Josefskaserne and the Ferdinandkaserne in Karlín. The Ergänzungsbezirkskommando was however still there in October, so if Šnábl had any base in the real world he would surely have belonged to this unit. Still it seems that the building was used by the military also later. In 1915 Landsturm drafts took place here and in 1916 Prager Tagblatt reports about Hungarian soldiers on the site. In 1919 the building was used for recruitment of army volunteers. The barracks were demolished in 1922 and the former site is now only partly occupied by buildings.

Links

Quote from the novel
[1.10.3] Kdyby zde byla pravá ořechovka,“ povzdechl, „ta by mně spravila žaludek. Taková ořechovka, jako má pan hejtman Šnábl v Brusce.“
Vršovice kasárnann flag
Na Mičánkách 429/-, Vršovice-K.u.k. Ärar [1907]
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vrsovice_kasarna.png

IR 73. - Vereidigung des VIII. Marschbataillon in Prag Wrschowitz, März 1915. © Michael Kummer

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Geschichte des ehemaligen Egerländer Infanterie-Regiments Nr. 73

Vršovice kasárna was a garrison where Švejk dropped by to borrow money from Lieutenant Mahler. In [I.14] and [I.15], the plot may the most part takes place in Vršovice, without this being stated explicitly. Some indication is the fact that Blahník took the stolen dog Max here, but in the next chapter Lukáš seems to live much nearer the centre.

Background

Vršovice kasárna probably refers to the barracks in Vršovice that were home of the 73rd infantry regiment (IR73) at the time. It housed the regiment's staff and three battalions. In contrary to other Bohemian regiments they were allowed to stay in their home barracks until 1918. Most of the military personnel left the barracks hastily after the revolution of 28 October 1918 and set off to their home region of Eger (now Cheb). The barracks were immediately taken over by local militiamen (Sokol) and a few days later the newly formed Czechoslovak artillery moved in. The site was used by the military until the 1950's and now houses the court of four districts.

There was also another barrack in Vršovice but as it was used by 8. Traindivision and is probably a less likely candidate than the above-mentioned infantry barracks. The address was Palackého třída 334 (now Moskevská). These barrack compex was eztenisve and contained staff buildings, stables, stores and officer's accommodation. The barracks were gradually demolished between 1965 and 1983 and the housing estate Vlasta now occupies the site.

Links

Source: Michael Kummer

Quote from the novel
[1.10.3] Jestli tam nepochodíte, tak půjdete do Vršovic, do kasáren k nadporučíkovi Mahlerovi.
Index Back Forward I. In the rear Hovudpersonen

10. Švejk as a military servant to the field chaplain


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